Transcripts of full meetings of the council.

  • Good

    morning, everyone.

  • (Good morning.)

  • The

    hour has come. It's clear we have

    established a quorum. I'd ask all

    visitors and guests to please reside

    behind the rail. Thank you.

    To give our invocation this morning, the Chair recognizes the Reverend Robert Paul, Pastor of the Piney Grove Baptist Church. He is here today as the guest of Councilwoman Bass.

    Will all guests and visitors and members please rise.

  • (Members and guests rise.)

  • Shall we pray.

    Eternal and Gracious Father, we come now in the mighty name of Jesus. God, we thank you for Philadelphia. We thank you, God, for our illustrious Mayor and his entire cabinet. We thank you, God, for our President of the City Council and all the constituents, all of

    the members. We thank you, God, for

    Sister Cindy Bass and all those that you

    have appointed their hands to do.

    God, we pray that you will make

    us cognizant and conscious of the fact

    that you've given some authority, but,

    Lord, you are still the chief authority.

    You have all powers, and, Lord, you can do all things but fail.

    So, Father, give us wisdom from on high. Help us to deliberate. Help us to be conscious and knowing that you're holding us all with accountability.

    We pray for the sick and afflicted. We pray for the orphans. We pray for the destitute, Father. Make us more like thee and less of us.

    And, Lord, however you do the things that you're going to do, we will surely give your name all the praise, all the glory, and all the honor.

    This is our prayer. In Jesus' name, amen.

  • Thank you so much, Pastor.

    Council will be at ease.

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Thank you again, Pastor.

    The next order of business is

    the approval of the Journal of the meeting of Thursday, January 24th, 2013.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Greenlee.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move that the Journal of the meeting of Thursday, January 24th, 2013 be approved.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded that the Journal of the meeting of Thursday, January 24th be approved.

    All those in favor say aye.

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. The Journal is approved.

    The next order of business is

    requests for leaves of absence.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman

    Jones.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. On behalf of the majority, there are no requests for leaves of absence today.

  • The Chair thanks the gentleman.

    The Chair now recognizes Councilman O'Neill for request for leaves of absence.

  • On behalf of the republicans, there are no requests for leave of absence.

  • Thank you, sir.

    The Chair will dispense with the regular order of business to welcome and thank all of the individuals who

    chose to come down to City Council today.

    We hope that your experience today will

    be a pleasurable one so you feel like

    coming back again. So I want to thank

    all of you. We really look forward to

    enjoying the wonderful experience of

    having our citizens watch us in action

    today. So thank you all so very much.

    At this time, the Chair recognizes Councilman Kenney, who will present a resolution honoring the outstanding lifetime musical achievements of Peter Nero. Would Mr. Nero and those accompanying him please join the Councilman at the podium.

    And the Councilman is joined by Councilman Squilla and Councilwoman Bass and Councilwoman Brown.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. This is a resolution honoring the outstanding lifetime musical achievements of Peter Nero, and recognizing his innumerable contributions to arts and culture in Philadelphia as an

    award-winning pianist and the founding

    conductor and Artistic Director of the

    world renowned Peter Nero and the Philly

    POPS Orchestra.

    Whereas, born in Brooklyn, New

    York, Peter Nero began his formal

    training at age seven. By the time he

    was 14, he was accepted to New York City's prestigious High School of Music and Art and won a scholarship to the Juilliard School of Music;

  • And whereas, Mr. Nero's early career included appearances on many national variety and talk shows including 11 great appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show and numerous appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson; and

    Whereas, Mr. Nero recorded his first album in 1961 and won a Grammy Award that year for "Best New Artist." Since then, he has received another Grammy, garnered 10 additional nominations, and released 68 albums; and

    Whereas, recognized as one of

    America's premier pops orchestras, Peter

    Nero and the Philly POPS was founded in

    1979 under his musical leadership. They

    are now recognized as the official pops

    orchestra of the Commonwealth of

    Pennsylvania and have remained a vital

    part of Philadelphia's cultural pulse; and

  • Whereas, Mr. Nero's long list of honors include: the American Federation of Musicians' Lifetime Achievement Award; the Abraham Lincoln Foundation of the Union League of Philadelphia's Lincoln Award; the Mario Lanza Award, in recognition for outstanding achievements in the field of music; six honorary doctorates; the prestigious International Society of Performing Arts Presenters Award for Excellence in the Arts; being named on the Philadelphia and Miami historic walks of fame; and the Pennsylvania Distinguished Arts Award; and

    Whereas, Peter Nero's

    enthusiastic and seemingly endless

    talents have gained him invitations to

    perform during numerous

    nationally-televised concerts and with

    symphonies from around the globe. He has

    collaborated with musicians and

    celebrities of every stripe, and his successful "The Summer of '42" became a million-selling single album; and

  • Whereas, Mr. Nero and his eponymous orchestra continue to elicit international attention while strengthening Philadelphia's cultural significance domestically and abroad. In addition to critical acclaim, their standards of excellence enrich the lives of Philadelphians through: an active role in our City's Fourth of July celebrations for over 25 years; its establishment as a resident company of The Kimmel Center for Performing Arts; and frequent performances as the Philadelphia -- and

    frequent performances at other

    Philadelphia landmarks such as the

    National Constitution Center and

    Independence Hall; and

    Whereas, Mr. Nero is an active

    supporter of many important causes,

    including the funding of school music

    programs, funding for the building of new arts centers across the country, as well as research for cancer, dystonia, and autism; now, therefore, be it

    Resolved, by the Council of the City of Philadelphia, that Council does hereby recognize, honor, and thank Peter Nero for his lifetime of contributions to musical excellence and his commitment to preserving Philadelphia as a national focal point for arts and culture. We wish him and the Philly POPS continued success.

    Further resolved, that an engrossed copy of this resolution be presented to Artistic Director Peter Nero as evidence of the sincere sentiments of

    this legislative body.

  • (Applause.)

  • The

    Chair recognizes Mr. Nero for remarks.

    Thank you, sir.

  • Thank you,

    Councilpersons. Thank you, Councilman

    Kenney. Did I really do all of those things? No wonder I'm so tired.

    Actually, I did all that in less time than it took for the completion of the Blue Route. I learned that when I got here, that that was the local joke. That was 1979.

    Actually, I'm really energized and flattered and appreciative, and I thank you, Councilman Kenney and the rest of the members of the Council, for bestowing this honor on me.

    After traveling the country on tour since 1961, which included Philadelphia by the way, the opportunity arose for another orchestra in this great city, and since Boston had the Boston

    Pops, why not Philadelphia and the

    Philadelphia Pops, in this case the

    Philly Pops. Moe Septee, the founder,

    had a vision that he was able to bring to

    fruition. I got the call in 1979 to be

    the music director and have been here

    ever since. Made Philly my home in 1988,

    leaving California to make Philly home base. On one of my concerts when I was Pops' music director of the Tulsa Philharmonic, I had the great trumpet player "Dizzy" Gillespie as guest artist. On a rehearsal break we got into a rap about where we lived. I told him I had just moved from California to Philly. He took a step back and stared at me. He said, You moved to Philly? I moved to California from Philly.

    Now, I had been told by the natives here that Philly being in the shadow of New York City was a constant irritant to the locals, and it manifested itself in a civic inferiority complex. Well, it didn't take long for this city

    to embrace us, and a renaissance began

    here, not necessarily coincidental but it

    did, with new highly rated restaurants,

    renovations of historic edifices,

    expansion of the waterfront, a new

    convention center and new hotels. I

    found a strong sense of community here

    that I had never felt in other mega cities. People would stop me on the street, and it wasn't for an autograph or for any semblance of celebrity. They wanted to tell me how much they enjoyed the concerts and actually thanked me for what really amounted to me just doing my job. Sometimes I had to wonder if I was getting paid or doing a benefit. Granted, it takes 24/7 to make each series and concert better than the last one.

    So I thank you, Councilman Kenney and other members of the Council, for this honor and hope I can live up to the expectations of this citation.

  • (Applause.)

  • Mr. President, if I may, we're going to

    do a little something different while we

    take the official photograph. We will be

    playing his Grammy Award -- Mr. Nero's

    Grammy Award-winning music "Mountain

    Greenery." So we'll have a little

    interlude while we take our picture.

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Thank you so much. Councilman, I think you started something. I anticipate getting additional requests for music during the presentations.

    Before we call for our next presentation, I would like to acknowledge and welcome a good friend of ours, State Senator Anthony Williams, who is joining us today.

  • (Applause.)

  • At this time, the Chair recognizes

    Councilwoman Brown, who will present a

    resolution recognizing the 30th

    Anniversary of Disadvantaged Business

    Enterprise, also known as DBE, Programs

    in the City of Philadelphia. Would

    Angela Dowd-Burton and those accompanying

    her please join the Councilwoman at the

    podium.

    And I see we also have Councilwoman Blackwell, Councilman Goode, Councilwoman Tasco, and Councilman Johnson joining us and also Councilwoman Bass.

  • Mr. President, before we move to the formal remarks and presentation of this extremely important milestone in leveling the playing field, we need to be mindful that this morning we stand here on the shoulders of champion, former Congressman, Councilman, activist Lucien Blackwell.

  • (Applause.)

  • We stand

    on the shoulder of one of his partners,

    the father of State Senator Anthony Hardy

    Williams, Senator Hardy Williams.

  • (Applause.)

  • So us

    newbies need to be forever mindful that there were people on the front line, carrying the baton, getting the marathon done to level the playing field for women, minorities, and those that are disabled.

    I'm going to ask Councilman Goode and Councilwoman Blackwell to offer remarks first also before we move to the formal proceeding.

  • Thank you very much. Good morning.

  • (Good morning.)

  • As always, I thank God for each day and each privilege of service as we try to perform our duties, and it is an honor for me.

    As you remember, last week we mentioned

    it was the 10th anniversary last Thursday

    of Lucien's passing, and I'm honored that

    we get a chance to mention him again

    today.

    Yes, it was he given the

    information by John Macklin when he

    introduced the legislation that minorities were getting less than one-tenth of one percent of all contracts let in the City of Philadelphia, and that started it. And even though we're not where we could be and should be, we're not where we were.

    So we thank God for his service. We thank God that we realize that we have to champion the causes of all people who live, work, and visit our city. And, again, thank you very much.

  • (Applause.)

  • My colleague is a bit modest about his father's accomplishment, but we would be remiss without stating, memorializing, and

    documenting that a courageous Mayor by

    the name of W. Wilson Goode took this

    cause upon his shoulders and moved this

    important public policy issue to its

    forefront, and $583 million under his

    watch later, minorities and females made

    progress in this town.

  • (Applause.)

  • A huge thank you as well to every person on this stage who played some role in this thread of trying to level the playing field.

    Recognizing the 30th Anniversary of Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Programs in the City of Philadelphia.

  • Whereas, in 1980, a small group of Philadelphia business people formed the BrainTrust, selected Beverly Harper as President, and set as its goal the passage of legislation in Philadelphia that would guarantee minorities and women a share of City contracts; and

    Whereas, Dr. Edward Robinson,

    working under then Managing Director

    Wilson Goode, produced documentation that

    minorities and women were being awarded

    less than one percent of City contracts;

    and

  • Whereas, City Councilman Lucien E. Blackwell introduced legislation that amended Chapter 17-500 of The Philadelphia Code, thanks to the work of John Macklin who gave us the information, and Council overrode a mayoral veto by a vote of 16:0, and the Administration promulgated regulations and guidelines; and

    Whereas, the Minority Business Enterprise Council (MBEC) was in service from 1982 to 1989 to ensure that minority, women and disabled owned enterprises are afforded equal access and opportunity to compete for and secure contracts within the City of Philadelphia; and

  • Whereas, the

    first MBEC Council consisted of

    Dr. Lorraine Brown, Barbara Daniel Cox,

    Kemel Dawkins, Angela Dowd-Burton, John

    Smith, Geri Swift and Joe Young; and

    Whereas, past Executive

    Directors of the Office of the Minority

    Business Enterprise Council and Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) are Melvin LeGrande, Al Childs, Curtis Jones, Jr., Marla Hamilton, James Roundtree, Mike Williams, Carolyn Nichols, Michael Bell, Curtis Gregory and the current director, Angela Dowd-Burton; and

    Whereas, in 1990 until 2003 MBEC existed under several executive orders; and

  • Whereas, in 2008, the Office of Economic Opportunity was created through executive order and the legal/legislative framework established Section 6-109 of the Charter in Chapters 17-1500 and 17-1600 of the City Code; and

    Whereas, Mayor Michael A.

    Nutter signed Executive Order 3-12 in

    September 2012, regarding

    Anti-Discrimination related to DBE's

    participating in City contracts; and

  • Whereas,

    Michael A. Nutter -- I'm sorry. Whereas,

    the Office of Economic Opportunity seeks to promote economic development through its certification program, contract review and monitoring activities, and ongoing interaction with other City departments, quasi-public agencies and the local marketplace; and

    Whereas, the Office of Economic Opportunity works with the Philadelphia business community to build internal and external alliances with minority business enterprises, women business enterprises, disadvantaged business enterprises and disabled business enterprises; and

  • Whereas, over the past five years, more than one billion dollars has been awarded to

    minority, women and disadvantaged

    business enterprises, due in no small

    part to the efforts of the Office of

    Economic Opportunity; and

    Whereas, Philadelphia has

    benefited tremendously from the

    incalculable efforts of legislative and

    executive action over the last 30 years which has encouraged increased DBE participation in City contracts; now, therefore, be it resolved

  • By the Council of the City of Philadelphia that we hereby recognize on this day the 30th Anniversary of Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Programs in the City of Philadelphia, the legislation that created it, the many minority business people who worked tirelessly to make it happen as a reality in our city.

    Further resolved, that an engrossed copy of this resolution be presented to the representatives from the Office of Equal Opportunity as evidence

    of the sincere sentiments of this

    legislative body.

    Let's congratulate every single

    person on this stage.

  • (Applause.)

  • Ms. Angela Dowd-Burton.

    MS. DOWD-BURTON: Thank you so much. I have to tell you, we did serious business in the sandbox 30 years ago, because we were all about five or so.

    So good morning, President Clarke, Councilwoman Reynolds Brown, members of City Council, elected officials, City administrators, former MBEC legacy leaders, I'll call you, friends, and guests. It is an honor to accept this resolution on behalf of those who served MBEC and OEO over 30 years ago.

    Thirty years ago, City Council built an intersection between public policy and the business imperative. They knew that when businesses rise, employees

    thrive and families flourish. When

    businesses rise, our youth find hope in

    the role models of their communities and

    seek education to pursue attainable

    dreams. When disadvantaged businesses

    rise, our region prospers.

    To the ancestors recognized in

    this resolution, we thank you for your vision.

    To the legislators that guide the spirit of economic inclusion today, we thank you for your focus and your tenacity.

    To Mayor Michael Nutter, his Economic Opportunity cabinet, leadership team, and City employees who engage in our mission every day, we appreciate your dedication and your commitment.

    And to our alliance partners, many who serve on the OEO Advisory Board, the Mayor's Advisory Commission on Construction Industry Diversity, and the Economic Opportunity Review Committee, we are grateful for your investment in the

    vision of OEO and your assistance in

    adding to the transparency of City

    government.

    Today the OEO staff, the OEO

    officers and colleagues within City

    government, and our predecessors can be

    proud of this milestone and celebrate the

    achievements thus far. Today we collectively reaffirm our commitment to building businesses and putting people to work.

    Time will not allow me to acknowledge all of you for the contributions you've made to the success of the MBEC and OEO. However, I would like to publicly thank members of the OEO team, and they're somewhere around here. Where are they? They're all behind me in here, cloaked in the spirit of economic opportunity.

    I want to thank them publicly for their dedication to our effort and the recent transformation of this organization. The Commerce Department is

    a great fit for OEO, thanks to Alan

    Greenberger, Kevin Dow, and the Commerce

    team and their staff.

    I would also like to mention

    just two people who have made OEO their

    life's work. Michelle Flamer, our

    attorney, has provided us with invaluable

    legal guidance and helped us navigate over the past few decades. And Julie Simmons, a specialist on the OEO staff, has provided continuity to this organization over the last 30 years.

    When small businesses rise, we are uplifted, invigorated, and inspired. And with the help of this august body, they will continue to rise and one day reach that pinnacle where business relationships will be driven by innovation, collaboration, and a competitive spirit far beyond the intersection of public policy and the business imperative.

    Thank you very much.

  • (Applause.)

    MS. DOWD-BURTON: I would like

    to have Beverly Harper, if she could,

    make a few brief comments from the

    BrainTrust.

  • Thank you. To

    Council President Clarke, Councilperson Reynolds Brown, and all of the City Council, it's hard for me to believe that it's been 30 years since an extraordinary group of minority business people came together. Among them, Greg Wheeler, Earl Pace, who is here today, Wayne Levy, Doris Burrell, Walt Hutchins, Dan Winoker, and many others. Many of us are still in business. I've been in business in Philadelphia for 43 years.

  • (Applause.)

  • I can't say enough about the work that Councilman Lu Blackwell, the role that he played in making this legislation a success.

  • (Applause.)

  • In the early days,

    almost every city that tried this kind of

    legislation was challenged. We had so

    many challenges, and the amazing thing

    was that this city, this Council, and the

    Administration met every challenge. If

    part of the legislation was knocked down,

    they went around it and put something else in place. Atlanta used to be the gold standard for this kind of legislation and making sure that the playing field was somewhat level for minority and women-owned businesses. Philadelphia has the longest-running track record in this, and we continue to go strong today and continue this effort to help minority firms, because we employ people, we pay taxes, and we're in Philadelphia. It's gratifying to know that you remember the history and that you honor it.

    I'd like now to introduce State Senator Anthony Hardy Williams to make a few remarks. I've known him and his

    father for a very long time.

  • (Applause.)

  • Great supporter.

    Thank you very much.

  • I want to

    thank the President for allowing me to

    interrupt this process, but I cannot tell

    you how much my heart is touched by the opportunity to express what I saw as a child, and, that is, not politicians, because frankly there were not a lot of African American or Latino or frankly Asian politicians at that time. There were people who were huddled in communities across the City of Philadelphia who felt it most appropriate and fair that all Philadelphians should have an opportunity to participate in the economic climate and activity of the City of Philadelphia.

    Certainly while I'm proud of my father, Bill Gray, there's a whole legacy, Wilson Goode, there's a whole generation that participated. Lucien

    Blackwell singularly designed, fought,

    struggled -- and, by the way, Council did

    not look like it looks today -- and

    struggled with Council with its

    conscience and drove them to the point of

    when they signed a document that frankly

    many in the public didn't understand at

    that time.

    The older I get -- I'm 55 years old -- the more history is no longer distant memories, but frankly a blueprint for the activities that provide a course of action. And I will tell you for as far as you've come, for every time an unfortunate set of circumstances where a young boy is shot down in the City of Philadelphia because he may be doing something that he doesn't know anything else, a young girl decides to make an inappropriate decision about her life or an ex-offender comes home, they look to one body; that is, government, maybe fairly or unfairly. But they look to the body government to define how the course

    of their life can change to become

    better.

    This piece of legislation has

    done multiple levels of good for

    generations of people that have gone in

    the past, but frankly for generations who

    will not get the opportunity to meet Lu

    Blackwell in person but only will feel the benefit of his good and blessings through the work that he has done on this earth.

    God bless you and God bless Philadelphia.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you.

    Council will be at ease.

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Folks, thank you very much.

    Folks, I'm going to ask you to please keep your voices down as you leave. We have one more presentation. Thank you very much.

    Thank you. At this time, the

    Chair recognizes Councilwoman Sanchez,

    who will present a resolution recognizing

    and honoring Philadelphia's leading

    Spanish-language newspaper, Al Dia, on

    the occasion of its 20th Anniversary, the

    publication of its first book "200 Years

    of Latino History in Philadelphia." Would Hernan Guaracoa and those accompanying him please join the Councilwoman.

    And I see we have Councilman Jones, Councilwoman Brown, and Councilman Oh also joining the Councilwoman.

  • Good morning. It is only fitting after that last presentation around how we celebrate milestones that we continue with this particular recognition. Many folks don't realize how long Latinos, Puerto Ricans have been in Philadelphia.

    On this particular occasion, we want to pay tribute to an important part of documenting our history so that we can

    celebrate our victories and, more

    importantly, remind us of the challenges

    still in front of us.

    So I want to thank my

    colleagues for joining me this morning.

    Many of them have traveled the streets of

    my district, of my neighborhood. They

    have visited my homeland and understand the culture and the struggle by which Puerto Ricans and Latinos come to the United States, and therefore I've asked them to join me today.

    Recognizing and honoring Philadelphia's leading Spanish-language newspaper, Al Dia, on the occasion of its 20th Anniversary and the publication of its first book "200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia." I want especially highlight the artistic work of my good friend David Cruz as part of this.

    Whereas, Al Dia was founded in 1992 by Hernan Guaracoa, a journalist who was told he was overqualified to work in

    existing community newspapers; and

    Whereas, Hernan and his wife,

    Elizabeth, started Al Dia in their second

    floor apartment in the Olney

    neighborhood; and

    Whereas, Hernan and Elizabeth

    quickly distinguished their paper with an

    uncommon level of professionalism and deep commitment to the principles of journalism; and

  • Whereas, Al Dia quickly grew in popularity, establishing itself as the most trusted source of news in the Latino community. By 2000, the growing paper moved its offices to Center City; and

    Whereas, Al Dia has grown from humble beginnings into a premier news organization, recognized nationally for its coverage of Latino issues, and distinguished locally by its success in expanding the political discourse to include issues of importance in Philadelphia's Latino community; and

    Whereas, Hernan's contributions

    have been recognized by his peers and he

    has served as the former president of the

    National Association of Hispanic

    Publications; and

  • Whereas, Al

    Dia has distinguished itself with

    coverage of immigration reform issues, with exceptional coverage of events of national importance such as those in Shenandoah and Hazleton, PA, and mass immigration demonstrations in Philadelphia; and

    Whereas, on August 8th of 2011, Al Dia was one of only five Spanish-language newspapers invited to the White House to interview President Barack Obama; and

    Whereas, Al Dia has created the national Felix Varela award, known as "The Spanish Pulitzer Prize," to recognize and support exceptional Spanish-language journalism; and

  • Whereas, Al Dia

    is by far the leading Spanish-language

    newspaper in the region; and

    Whereas, Al Dia provides the

    Latino community with coverage of both

    local and national news, as well as

    coverage of news events in Puerto Rico

    and throughout Latin America; and

    Whereas, Al Dia has published its first book, "200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia"; and

    Whereas, this 229-page book is divided into four sections: "Our Shared History," "Putting Down Roots: 1940 to 1980," "Eye on the Community: 1980 to 1992," and "Al Dia: 20 Years, 1992 to Present"; and

  • Whereas, the first section chronicles the arrival of the first Latino settlers to Philadelphia, including Felix Varela, a Cuban priest and journalist who came to Philadelphia in 1824 and founded the El Habanero newspaper; and

    Whereas, "Putting Down Roots"

    documents in images the Latino families

    who came over in major waves of

    immigration to Philadelphia in the 1940s

    and made the City their home; and

    Whereas, the "Eye of the

    Community" depicts the photography of

    celebrated photojournalist David Cruz, as

    he captures images that chronicle the diverse aspects and events that make up Philadelphia's Latino life in the 1980s and 1990s; and

  • Whereas, Al Dia captures the defining images -- that "Al Dia: 20 Years" captures the defining images of the coverage of 20 years of the Latino community; and

    The 20th anniversary of Al Dia and the publication of this historic book were celebrated in the ceremony gala at the Constitution Center last November.

    Be it resolved, that the Council of Philadelphia recognizes the incredible achievements of Al Dia newspaper and its founder, Hernan

    Guaracoa. Your contributions to the

    Latino community, Philadelphia and the

    field of journalism have been truly

    exceptional. We wish you many years of

    continued success with both your paper

    and future publications.

    Further resolved, that an

    engrossed copy will be presented to Mr. Guaracoa. This is signed, introduced by Councilwoman Sanchez and sponsored by all members of City Council.

    Thank you.

  • (Applause.)

  • The Chair recognizes Mr. Guaracoa for remarks.

  • Well, I'm here to say gracias, first of all. Thank you so much for this recognition. I think it's the recognition of myself, the recognition of the staff that have believed in the mission of Al Dia that have been simple over the past 20 years.

    For those who don't know much

    about Al Dia, you know, know just the

    paper that you see in the streets and the

    car that drive around in the City, this

    was yet another idea born in the

    neighborhood 20 years ago. This, for

    those who don't know, was a one-man

    operation, homemade business 20 years

    ago, putting out of our home, which used to be my home in North Philadelphia, a newsletter that evolved to be, through many efforts, the publication that you know today.

    So I'd like to recognize the people that are here standing with me who are part of our staff or part of the staff that put together that book, which was a true labor of love, where we attempted to put together in the covers of -- hard cover of a book like this the work that we did for 20 years. But beyond that, to record the history of the Latino community that have been part of the City of Philadelphia for the past 200 years. We found the photo albums of the

    family that lived here before even any

    Hispanic media existed in the '40s and

    the '50s and the '60s and the '70s.

    There's no Hispanic media. Now we have

    media that is beginning to tell that

    story that is largely in the shadows.

    We have to -- I want to thank

    Councilwoman Maria Sanchez for buying the book for each one of you. I encourage you to take a look at that and find the very beginning of this experience, started the very birth of the republic in 1780 when we had the first Latino who came to Philadelphia and was part of the life in the City for a couple of years. And we have other name that you will find in the book who attempted to put together basically the reality that have been in the shadows in this city. Now it turns out we have a media, and the work is largely undone, Maria. I think we have just begun to show, and this book is simply a modest punctuation to enlightenment on Latino issues. Where

    these people that continue to be in a big

    question mark in the City and in the

    country and our immigration reform is

    been discussed, I think it's for all of

    us to have a better understanding of what

    the Latino experience has been.

    I'm personally grateful for the

    recognition, and to us it's a challenge to continue in the work that we need to do.

    I just want to say thank you so much for the support we have received so far. And keep in mind that we are a media that was born in the neighborhood as a disadvantaged business. We are not corporate-owned media. We're media that was born in the neighborhood. It's a truly grassroots media that attempts to say what their distinct goal is what the Latino experience is in the City and what are the Latino perspective on the issues of the City.

    So thank you so much. And to Maria, thank you, Council President

    Darrell Clarke and all you members of

    City Council. And, of course, I would

    like to highlight the people that went

    through the big challenge of putting that

    work together. I have here with me David

    Cruz, who is the photographs of Al Dia

    for the past ten years.

  • (Applause.)

  • I also have the person that helped me craft the words, the imaginary Sabrina Vourvoulias.

  • (Applause.)

  • And then the person that put the torch of the sign on the art, our art director, Yesid Vargas.

  • (Applause.)

  • I have here with me also for those that I met in the North Philadelphia many years ago and he was before David the one who was taking the pictures for us working part time with paper picture. So Peter Fitzpatrick is here with me. He's a friend of Al Dia and also a contributor to the book.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you so much.

    Council will be at ease.

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Thank you so much.

    The next order of business is communications. The Chair requests that the Sergeant-of-Arms deliver the messages from the Mayor to the Chief Clerk.

    Mr. Decker, do you have any messages?

  • There are no messages from the Mayor, Mr. President.

  • Thank you.

    The next order of business is the introduction of bills and resolutions.

    Councilman, do you want to be recognized now?

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Green.

  • Thank you,

    Mr. President. I must leave on business

    and ask that I be recorded as voting aye

    on all bills.

  • Leave shall be granted. Thank you.

    Councilman, all bills and resolutions, correct?

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The next order of business is the introduction of bills and resolutions.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Kenney.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer two resolutions, which I would like to be considered

    today.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    Mr. Decker.

  • A privileged

    resolution authorizing the Committee of

    the Whole to hold public hearings to

    examine the current state of gun violence in the City of Philadelphia, and review how effectively the City spends its resources combatting the issue.

  • That resolution will be on today's Final Passage Calendar.

  • And a privileged resolution honoring the Philadelphia School on its forty-year anniversary for continuing its unique commitment to excellence in education and cultivating lifelong learners with pride in their city and country.

  • That resolution will also be on today's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes

    Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Thank

    you, Mr. President. Today I introduce

    one resolution co-sponsored by everyone,

    and this is one of the leaders of MBEC

    and the minority program in our city.

  • A privileged resolution honoring and recognizing Kemel W. Dawkins, Sr. for his extraordinary service and dedication to the development of the minority business community in Philadelphia.

  • That resolution will be placed on today's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Greenlee.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. Today I offer one bill and one resolution on your behalf.

  • An ordinance

    amending Title 6 of The Philadelphia

    Code, entitled "Health Code," by adding a

    new Chapter providing for the regulation

    of tanning facilities; amending Section

    6-102, by adding definitions; and making

    technical changes.

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And a non-privileged resolution authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to execute and deliver to the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, without consideration, deeds conveying conditional fee simple title to certain City-owned lots or pieces of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon, situate in the Twenty-Eighth, Twenty-Ninth, and Thirty-Second Wards of the City of Philadelphia.

  • That

    that resolution will be placed on next

    week's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman

    Henon.

  • Thank you,

    Council President. Today I offer one

    bill co-introduced with Councilman Kenney

    and Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown and one non-privileged resolution co-introduced with Councilman Kenney.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 10-700 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Refuse and Littering," by requiring the recycling of construction and demolition debris.

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And a privileged resolution authorizing City Council's Committee on Labor and Civil Service to hold hearings on the actions of the Civil

    Service Commission as it pertains to

    terms imposed on AFSCME Local 2186

    District Council 47.

  • That

    resolution will be referred to

    committee -- that will be placed on

    today's Final Passage Calendar. Thank

    you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Tasco.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I have no bills or resolutions today.

  • Thank you, Councilwoman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • Mr. President, I have one privileged resolution.

  • A privileged resolution honoring, recognizing and

    commending 100 Black Men of America,

    Inc. - Philadelphia Chapter for its

    extraordinary service focused on

    mentoring, education, health and

    wellness, and economic development.

  • Thank you. That will be placed on

    today's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Sanchez.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I have two resolutions and one bill.

  • An ordinance providing for the submission to the qualified electors of the City of Philadelphia of an amendment to Article VIII, Chapter 5 of The Philadelphia Home Rule Charter, entitled "Referenda Approved by the Voters," by adding a new section providing that the citizens of Philadelphia urge the United States

    Congress to propose, and the Pennsylvania

    General Assembly to ratify, an amendment

    to the United States Constitution that

    would defend democracy from the

    corrupting effects of undue corporate

    power by overturning the decision of the

    United States Supreme Court; fixing the

    date of a special election for such purpose; prescribing the form of ballot question to be voted on; and authorizing the appropriate officers to publish notice and to make arrangements for the special election.

  • That will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And a resolution proposing an amendment to the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter, entitled "Referenda Approved by Voters," by adding a new section providing that the citizens of Philadelphia urge the United States Congress to propose, and the Pennsylvania General Assembly to ratify, an amendment

    to the United States Constitution that

    would defend democracy from the

    corrupting effects and undue corporate

    power.

  • That

    resolution will also be referred to

    committee.

  • And a non-privileged resolution authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to execute and deliver to the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, without consideration, deeds conveying conditional fee simple title to certain City-owned lots or pieces of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon, situate in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Wards of the City of Philadelphia.

  • That resolution will be placed on next week's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman O'Brien.

  • Thank you,

    Mr. President. I have no bills or

    resolutions today.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman

    Goode.

  • Thank you,

    Mr. President. I offer no bills or resolutions today.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Brown.

  • Good morning, Mr. President. I offer one resolution this morning.

  • A privileged resolution honoring the African American Children's Book Project on the occasion of the 21st Annual African American Children's Book Fair.

  • That

    resolution will be placed on today's

    Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman

    Jones.

  • Thank you,

    Mr. President. Four bills, one

    privileged resolution.

  • An ordinance to amend the Philadelphia Zoning Maps by changing the zoning designations of certain areas of land located within an area bounded by Belmont Avenue, Monument Avenue, Ford Road, and Edgley Avenue (extended).

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And an ordinance to amend the Philadelphia Zoning Maps by changing the zoning designations of certain areas of land located within an area bounded by Overbrook Avenue, 54th

    Street, Woodbine Avenue, Wynnefield

    Avenue, and 56th Street.

  • That

    bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance

    to amend the Philadelphia Zoning Maps by

    changing the zoning designations of

    certain areas of land located within an area bounded by City Avenue, Cardinal Avenue, Overbrook Avenue, and 59th Street.

  • The bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance to amend the Philadelphia Zoning Maps by changing the zoning designations of certain areas of land located within an area bounded by City Avenue, 52nd Street, Overbrook Avenue, and 54th Street.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And a privileged resolution honoring and celebrating Philadelphia's living legends, Henry

    Nicholas, Nellie Reynolds, Madeline Dunn,

    John White, Jr., Reverend Albert F.

    Campbell, Acel Moore, Audrey

    Johnson-Thornton, Will Daniels,

    Dr. Bernard Anderson, and Emma Chappell

    in the areas of government, business,

    labor, journalism, religion, academia,

    athletics, and activism, as part of the commemoration of Black History Month.

  • That resolution will be placed on today's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman O'Neill.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I have no bills or resolutions.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Squilla.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer one bill.

  • An ordinance

    amending Section 6 of an Ordinance (Bill

    No. 120396) approved September 13, 2012,

    entitled "An ordinance authorizing

    Northern Liberties Auction to construct,

    use and maintain various encroachments

    within the right-of-way on the north sidewalk of Spring Garden Street between North Third Street and Bodine Street."

  • Thank you. That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Bass.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I have two bills and one privileged resolution today.

  • An ordinance amending Title 16 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Public Property," by providing for a prohibition on firearms

    and deadly weapons in or around

    City-owned or City-occupied facilities.

  • Thank you. That bill will be referred to

    the appropriate committee.

  • And an ordinance

    amending Title 17 of The Philadelphia

    Code, entitled "Contracts and Procurement," by providing for an online publication of concession agreements and related information, and by requiring the preparation and distribution of certain reports concerning concessions.

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And a privileged resolution honoring, recognizing and commending Philadelphia Police Officer Kimberly Lyons, Officer Antonio Soto, Officer Gregory Giacomelli, Officer Michael McCormick, Officer Jerome Joseph, and Officer Evelyn Reyes for their extraordinary acts of bravery and courage

    resulting in all being named 39th Police

    District Officers of the Month for

    December 2012.

  • Thank you. That resolution will be

    placed on today's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman

    Oh.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer no bills or resolutions today.

  • Thank you, sir.

    That concludes our introduction. The next order of business is reports from committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Greenlee for a report from the Committee of Rules.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. The Committee on Rules reports two bills with a favorable recommendation.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    Mr. Decker, please read the

    report.

  • To the President

    and members of the Council of the City of

    Philadelphia, the Committee on Rules, to

    which was referred Bill No. 120958,

    entitled "An ordinance to amend the Philadelphia Zoning Maps by changing the zoning designations of certain areas of land located within an area bounded by Allegheny Avenue, American Street, Lippincott Street, Second Street, a railroad right-of-way and 5th Street"; and

    Bill No. 121033, entitled "An ordinance to amend the Philadelphia Zoning Maps by changing the zoning designations of certain areas of land located within an area bounded by Grant Avenue, Lavender Street, Primrose Road, Holyoke Road and Academy Road," respectfully reports it has considered the same and returns the attached bills

    to Council with a favorable

    recommendation.

  • Thank you.

    The Chair again recognizes

    Councilman Greenlee.

  • Thank

    you, Mr. President. I move that the rules of Council be suspended so as to permit first reading this day of Bill Nos. 120958 and 121033.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • Thank you. It has been moved and properly seconded that the rules of Council be suspended this day to permit the reading of Bills No. 120958 and 121033.

    All those in favor say aye.

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. Those bills will be placed

    on the First Reading Calendar today.

    The next order of business is

    the consideration of the Calendar. I

    note that the bills just reported from

    committee with suspension have been

    deemed to have had a first reading.

    These bills will be on the Second Reading and Final Passage Calendar at our next session of Council.

    As there are no additional bills on the First Reading Calendar, the Chair now recognizes Councilman Jones for the purpose of calling up bills and resolutions for today's Calendar.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. The following resolutions and bills are being called up for Second Reading and Final Passage Calendars today: Nos. 121013 and 121039. All other resolutions and bills are being held.

  • Thank you so much, Councilman.

    Before considering these

    resolutions and bills on the Final

    Passage Calendar, we will have public

    comment. The public comment will go as

    follows:

    There will be a podium placed

    in the middle of the Council. You will

    have three minutes to speak. We have these guidelines in place to ensure that everyone has an opportunity to speak. The bills and/or the resolutions that you speak of today must be on the Final Passage Calendar. So we ask you to please adhere to those particular rules.

    At this time, Mr. Decker, can you please read the name of the first witness.

  • Mr. Ed O'Donnell, commenting on 120232.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Yes; the resolution on reducing crime in the

    Philadelphia Housing Authority. And,

    first, if you read St. Matthew on what

    we're judged on, helping the people at

    the bottom of society, the poor, the

    prisoner, the homeless, mentally ill,

    unemployed, sick, I want to thank

    Councilwoman Blackwell for always working

    to help the people at the bottom of society. She's doing what Martin Luther King and the late Senator Robert Kennedy did, and I've come to see she gets this commitment from an unshakeable faith in God and her church, and I appreciate that.

    Now, Philadelphia Housing Authority, reducing crime. The police have a saying "gateway drugs," meaning cigarettes, alcohol, caffeine, pills can lead to illegal drugs. We had a beautiful seminar in Wilmington at the Grand Opera House creating livable communities. If we make Philadelphia Housing Authority litter free, you know, immaculate, clean, beautiful outside,

    inside, if we have everybody be friendly,

    we eliminate rudeness, if we eliminate

    the second-hand cigarette smoke making

    people sick; in other words, if we create

    a livable community at Philadelphia

    Housing Authority and throughout the

    City, cleanliness, friendliness, help,

    when people feel good physically and mentally, they don't commit crimes. So let's work to create the pre-conditions that make people healthy and happy. Then they don't want to commit crimes. So this hearing would be very important to do that, create a livable community.

    Thank you.

  • Thank you, sir, for your testimony.

  • Robert Taylor, commenting on 120340-AAA.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Good morning, President Clarke, members of Council,

    ladies and gentlemen. I'm Robert Taylor,

    President of Local 700 with the Transport

    Workers Union. I'm also a commentator on

    WPEB 88.1, the Jasper Jones Show. I am

    commenting today on Bill No. 120340-AAA.

    I want to thank Councilmembers

    Jones, Clarke, Oh, Goode, Tasco,

    Greenlee, Kenney, Henon, Johnson, Blackwell, O'Brien, Sanchez, O'Neill, Brown, Squilla, and Bass. This is an ordinance that is going to amend The Philadelphia Code authorizing and granting of tax exemptions to longtime owner-occupants of certain properties in Philadelphia.

    I'm in favor of all tax relief, especially relief to homeowners. It is terrible to see anyone put out on the street because they couldn't afford to pay their taxes. So I think that this is great. Of course, I would like to go further to say that I hope that these lower taxes can be extended generally, for the power to tax is also the power to

    destroy. We should, of course, as a city

    be enabling our people to create new

    businesses and to hold on to their

    properties.

    Thank you.

  • There are no

    other speakers on the public comment

    list, Mr. President.

  • Thank you so much, Mr. Decker.

    We will now have our Calendar. Mr. Decker, can you please read the title of Resolution 121013.

  • A resolution approving the redevelopment contract of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for the redevelopment and urban renewal of a portion of the Models Cities Urban Renewal Area, identified by house numbers and street addresses as 1415 North Fourth Street and 1419 North Fourth Street.

  • Thank you.

    The Chair recognizes

    Councilwoman Sanchez for a motion.

  • Thank

    you, Mr. President. I move the adoption

    of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It

    has been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. 121013 has been adopted.

    Mr. Decker, would you please read the title of Bill No. 121039.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 19-2600 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Business Income and Receipts Taxes," by further revising the "Special Tax Credit Opportunity for Job Creation."

  • This bill having been read on two separate

    days, the question is shall the bill pass

    finally.

    Mr. Decker, please call the

    roll.

  • Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Councilman Green is voting aye.

    Councilman Greenlee.

  • Councilman Johnson.

  • Councilman

    O'Brien.

  • Councilman

    O'Neill.

  • Councilwoman Quinones-Sanchez.

  • Councilwoman Reynolds Brown.

  • Councilman Squilla.

  • Councilwoman Tasco.

  • Council President Clarke.

  • Aye.

    The ayes are 17; the nays are

    zero. A majority of all members present

    having voted in the affirmative, the bill

    passes.

    Mr. Decker, do you have any

    additional resolutions?

  • A privileged resolution authorizing the Committee of the Whole to hold public hearings to examine the current state of gun violence in the City of Philadelphia, and review how effectively the City spends its resources combatting the issue, introduced by Councilman Kenney.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Kenney.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • And a privileged

    resolution honoring the Philadelphia School on its forty-year anniversary for continuing its unique commitment to excellence in education and cultivating lifelong learners with pride in their city and country, introduced by Councilman Kenney.

  • The Chair again recognizes Councilman Kenney.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • And a privileged

    resolution honoring and recognizing Kemel

    W. Dawkins, Sr. for his extraordinary service and dedication to the development of the minority business community in Philadelphia, introduced by Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • And a privileged

    resolution authorizing City Council's

    Committee on Labor and Civil Service to

    hold hearings on the actions of the Civil

    Service Commission as it pertains to terms imposed on AFSCME Local 2186 District Council 47, introduced by Councilman Henon.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Henon.

  • I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • And a privileged

    resolution honoring, recognizing and

    commending 100 Black Men of America,

    Inc. - Philadelphia Chapter for its

    extraordinary service focused on

    mentoring, education, health and

    wellness, and economic development, introduced by Councilman Johnson.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • Mr. President, I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • And a privileged

    resolution honoring the African American

    Children's Book Project on the occasion

    of the 21st Annual African American

    Children's Book Fair, introduced by

    Councilwoman Reynolds Brown.

  • The

    Chair recognizes Councilwoman Brown.

  • Mr. President, I move for a motion.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • And a privileged resolution honoring and celebrating Philadelphia's living legends, Henry Nicholas, Nellie Reynolds, Madeline Dunn,

    John F. White, Jr., Reverend Albert F.

    Campbell, Acel Moore, Audrey

    Johnson-Thornton, Will Daniels,

    Dr. Bernard E. Anderson, and Emma

    Chappell in the areas of government,

    business, labor, journalism, religion,

    academia, athletics, and activism, as

    part of the commemoration of Black History Month, introduced by Councilman Jones.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Jones.

  • Mr. President, I move for the adoption.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • And a privileged

    resolution honoring, recognizing and

    commending Philadelphia Police Officer

    Kimberly Lyons, Officer Antonio Soto,

    Officer Gregory Giacomelli, Officer

    Michael McCormick, Officer Jerome Joseph,

    and Officer Evelyn Reyes for their

    extraordinary acts of bravery and courage resulting in all being named 39th Police District Officers of the Month for December 2012, introduced by Councilwoman Bass.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Bass.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. The resolution is adopted.

  • There are no

    other resolutions on the Final Passage

    Calendar, Mr. President.

  • Thank you so much.

    Are there any speeches on the part of the minority?

  • (No response.)

  • Are there any speeches on the part of the majority?

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Jones.

  • Thank you so much, Mr. President. Most of us watched in horror the news when the five-year-old young lady Nailla Robinson was abducted. We also sat riveted in terror when we watched the young lady that was thrown from the platform at 8th and Race.

    What these two seemingly

    unrelated incidences have in common, what

    was the common denominator? Surveillance

    cameras. Fortunately we were able to

    apprehend one and are still on the trail

    of the other perpetrator. But I want to

    make that common denominator note,

    because you took a delegation of

    Councilmembers down to Baltimore a couple of weeks ago to look into how we can use those technological tools to help law enforcement, to help police work, to not circumvent what good citizen and good police work should do, but to aid it in its swift delivery.

    Your leadership, along with Councilman Greenlee, Councilwoman Bass, myself, and more recently intriguing conversations by the freshman Councilman Johnson on public-private partnerships with cameras is encouraging in that effort. I applaud you for having hearings that will discuss how we roll out a comprehensive strategy to use that.

    What we learned in Baltimore

    was that through the use of cameras,

    through networking, through Department of

    Defense, Department of Transportation

    cameras, they were able to reduce crime

    in Baltimore by 25 percent. And one of

    the key ways they did that was eyes on

    criminal activity, communications to law

    enforcement who had boots on the ground. And that was a critical component of their success.

    Working with partnerships is fine. Having stagnant cameras is not as good as having good police work using technology in a well-thought-out manner.

    So I look forward to working with you and our colleagues in Council to help the Administration, to assist the Administration, to work along with the Administration to use this tool to deal with Philadelphia's problem. So, again, thank you for your leadership in taking us down there, and I look forward to the results of that endeavor.

  • Thank you, Councilman. It was a very

    productive road trip, and thank you all

    for coming along and providing

    much-needed input. We look forward to

    continuing such road trips to ensure that

    we can enhance the City of Philadelphia

    at its lowest possible cost.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I want to commend and I look forward to the hearing that was introduced, resolution introduced for a hearing on the issue of gun violence in the City of Philadelphia by Councilman Kenney, and really -- although we are a local government and we can't have so much impact on state-related laws relating to gun violence in the City of Philadelphia, I still think it's important to make sure that rather it's the Administration or us as a body really take a hard look at what we're doing in the City of Philadelphia as it relates to

    preventing gun violence and also making

    sure when acts of gun violence takes

    place, we are addressing it

    appropriately.

    Last night when I was on one of

    my favorite apps, which is the CNN app, I

    know it noted that Philadelphia is in the

    top three of African American young men being murdered by homicide, and the number one tool in their homicide is a gun.

    And so I'm looking forward to that discussion to make sure that we keep this issue on the forefront, we keep it on the burner as it relates to making sure we keep our young people safe, but also giving young men other options regarding picking up a gun. And I think that's a real conversation that needs to take place, but I'm also interested in looking at when we do -- when the Philadelphia Police Department confiscates a gun in a homicide, in a shooting, what happens after those guns

    go into the department? Do they do the

    CSI work and kind of trace where the gun

    come from, or it's just a homicide and

    it's a shooting and then nothing happens?

    So I'm looking forward to actually see

    what's the followup with these guns,

    because I think the assault weapons ban,

    I understand that policy, but the majority of homicides that take place in the City of Philadelphia and the majority of shootings that take place in the City of Philadelphia are by handguns. And so my biggest concern is choking that pipeline of illegal guns that come through neighborhoods throughout the City of Philadelphia.

    And so I wanted to acknowledge that hearing that will be taking place and look forward to that discussion.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman, and thank you for those very, very creative ideas that you gave to us a couple of days ago during

    our discussion about ensuring public

    safety measures across the City of

    Philadelphia, and we look forward to

    adopting that and implementing that in

    the City of Philadelphia.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman

    Kenney.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I just wanted to say a few words relative to Councilman Johnson's comments. First of all, I want to thank you and thank Councilman Jones and Councilman Johnson for all the work you've been doing over the years relative to gun safety, gun violence, crime, and gun control, and I admire all that you've done. One of the things that I would like to accomplish in this resolution is that while we wait for the national debate on gun control, assault weapons, multi-clip magazines, and background checks and the like and mental health issues, is that while we're waiting for that and while we're urging it and while

    we support it, we still have resources

    here that the District Attorney employs

    and that the Police Commissioner employs

    and that the mental health community

    employs. And while we're waiting for the

    changes, I think going into our budget

    cycle, I think we need to examine what's

    successful, things like GunStat, the 2.0 program. Those kinds of issues may need to be bulked up a bit while we wait for national assistance or state -- I doubt state assistance, but we'll always hold out some hope for that.

    So that's where I want to concentrate on that particular hearing as to what our law enforcement, mental health folks need to do a better job within the confines of the existing laws that we have to live with. So I appreciate your help with that.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman. Thank you for your continued good work.

    There are no other speeches.

    At this time, the Chair recognizes

    Councilwoman Brown for a motion for

    adjournment.

  • Surely,

    Mr. President. I move that Council stand

    adjourned until Thursday, February 7th,

    2013 at 10:00 a.m.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded that the Council stand adjourned until Thursday, February 7th, 2013, 10:00 a.m.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. Council shall stand adjourned.

    Thank you so much.

    (Stated Meeting adjourned at 12:05 p.m.)