Transcripts of full meetings of the council.

  • Good morning, everyone.

  • (Good morning.)

  • All right. I like that.

    We have established a quorum. I'd ask all guests and visitors to please retire behind the rail, and members have already taken their seat, so we're going to start.

    To give our invocation this morning, the Chair recognizes the Reverend William E. Grogan of All Saints Roman Catholic Church. He is here today as the guest of Councilman Bobby Henon.

    I would ask all guests and visitors and members to please rise.

  • (Members and guests rise.)

  • Thank you, Councilman Henon, for your invitation. Ladies and gentlemen of our City Council and fellow citizens of the City of Philadelphia, thank you for this honor.

    Pray with me for a moment.

    God of the universe, God of all creation, God of justice and mercy, God of wisdom and truth and understanding, we praise you for your goodness and your kindness to us. We thank you for the freedom with which you have blessed our country and for the hope and the courage with which you have blessed our people.

    Be with us here today to inspire and to direct all of our work. Purify us of all blindness and selfishness and greed. Fill us instead with your spirit of wisdom and right judgment so that we can be true servants of our people and of our city.

    We are the bearers of the joys and the hopes and the fears and the sadnesses of your family. Give us the mind and the heart of a grateful servant so that we can trust that your mercy and your abounding kindness will be made manifest in our work this day.

    We remember all those who have served us, especially those who have laid down their lives for us so that we might be safe, so that we might be free. Protect all of the women and the men who serve us now, those in the uniformed service of our country around the world and those who protect and serve us in our city. Keep them safe from all harm today.

    Drive out all anger and fear and dissension among us so that your peace may rain in our midst. Fill our minds and our hearts and our will to regard with generous loving care our sisters and our brothers who seek food and shelter and work and learning. May the power of your presence be a blessing to us today and always.

    Amen.

  • Thank you so much, Reverend.

    Council shall be at ease.

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Thank you so much. Before we start, I would ask all guests and visitors, if you have a device, be it cell phone, whatever, that makes any noise, I'd ask for you to please turn it off or turn it on silent. I really appreciate your cooperation with that.

    The next order of business is the approval of the Journal of the meeting of Thursday, May 16, 2013.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Greenlee.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move that the Journal of the meeting of Thursday, May 16, 2013 be approved.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded that the Journal of May 16, 2013 stand approved.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it, and the Journal is approved.

    The next order of business is requests for leaves of absence, and the Chair recognizes Councilman Jones.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. On behalf of the majority, we have one request for leave of absence from Councilwoman Tasco.

  • Leave shall be granted.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman O'Neill.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. On behalf of the republicans, there are no requests for leave of absence.

  • Thank you so much.

    At this time, I would like to dispense with the regular order of business. I would like to welcome and thank all of our guests and visitors for coming here today. We hope that your experience here today is a pleasurable one that will cause you to want to come back. So, again, thank you for being here. I know some of you all here will be back without a doubt.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you so much.

    At this time, the Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson, who will present a resolution honoring Bob Pantano. Would Mr. Pantano and those accompanying him please join the Councilman at the podium.

    And we also have Councilman Kenney joining the Councilman and Councilman Squilla and Councilman Henon.

  • (Good morning.)

  • (Good morning.)

  • Today I am truly honored and privileged to have this opportunity to acknowledge the hard work of a South Philadelphia icon in the music and entertainment industry. I am also proud to be supported by my South Philadelphia colleagues Councilman Mark Squilla and Councilman Jim Kenney, but also my Northeast Councilman, Councilman Bobby Henon, who are also big supporters of Mr. Bob Pantano.

  • (Applause.)

  • Many of you may or may not know that South Philadelphia is home to some of the greatest icons in the entertainment industry, and Mr. Bob Pantano have been providing oldies but goodies music. And I got an old soul as a freshman Councilman, so when you're talking about Marvin Gaye, Randella -- what's the other young lady's name -- Martha Wells -- Mary Wells. Martha and the Vandellas, thank you. Martha Reeves. Okay. Me and my mom used to clean on Sundays and she would be having the oldies on.

    But to the point, beyond the entertainment industry, I've also had a chance to work with Mr. Pantano in a variety of different charitable events. He's also a strong supporter of the annual MLK celebration down at the Landreth building in South Philadelphia. So I'm truly honored to recognize him for some of the great work that he have done. But I also want to acknowledge his wife, Ms. Debbie Pantano, who has also been an ambassador working with him, supporting him --

  • (Applause.)

  • -- on the radio station, and also Mr. Tony Harris, who is Bob's executive producer, make sure that when Bob brings the oldies and goodies to us on OGL 98, he makes sure that he has a solid and smooth presentation in terms of his radio program. And so I just want to acknowledge all the staff that are also here from WOGL.

    So at this time, the citation reads: Honoring, recognizing and commending Mr. Bob Pantano for his contributions on the radio, television, area concerts and his music, creativity, charity and community service.

    Whereas, a South Philadelphia native, Mr. Bob Pantano began spinning records at the hops in the late 1960s and in the 1970s at nightclubs. In 1971, he began his professional radio career at WCAM in Camden, New Jersey. In 1977, he pioneered the live-radio broadcast, Saturday Night Dance Party, which has entertained Philadelphia audiences with its upbeat music; and

    Whereas, Mr. Pantano continues to entertain and engaging crowds year after year, building a captive and loyal audience. During the past thirty-six years, his Live Radio Dance Party has been broadcast from various hotels, nightclubs, and casinos. Hundreds of thousands of Delaware Valley residents have met, danced and fallen in love to his unique special mix of music; and

  • Whereas, Mr. Pantano hosts the Vendemmia Festival in South Philadelphia along with his well-known Sounds of Philly Show which features some of the best local and national recording artists. Furthermore, Mr. Pantano hosted shows at Wachovia Center, Trump Plaza, Wildwood Convention Center, Penn's Landing, summer concerts in the Philadelphia and South Jersey parks, Resorts Casino Hotel, Atlantic City Hilton Casino Hotel, and corporate functions and charitable events; and

  • Whereas, Mr. Pantano is on the board of directors of Variety - The Children's Charity, helping children with disabilities. He's an honorary Deputy Police Commissioner and the MC of the Hero Plaque Program in Philadelphia, which commemorates the heroism of Philadelphia police officers, who gave their lives fighting in the line of duty. Mr. Pantano was also the MC for the annual Hero Thrill Show benefiting the families of our fallen heroes, both with the Police and the Fire families; and

  • Whereas, Mr. Pantano is involved with Church of Holy Family, Washington Township, New Jersey, where he hosts the annual Primavera Festival, the taste of South Philly at The Simone Auto Museum for Saints John Neumann & Maria Goretti Catholic High School, plus numerous other charitable events. Mr. Pantano's other endeavors include playing a crucial role in the promotion and success of the Frank Sinatra mural on the Avenue of the Arts in Philadelphia; and

    Whereas, in 2007, Mr. Pantano was inducted into Temple University School of Communications and the Theatre Hall of Fame and received a sidewalk plaque on the Wildwood Avenue of the Avenue of the Stars. In 2008, Mr. Pantano was inducted into the Broadcast Pioneer Hall of Fame; now therefore

  • Resolved, that the Council of the City of Philadelphia, hereby honors, recognizes and commends Mr. Bob Pantano for his commitment and dedication to the community through his music, creativity, charity and community service.

    Further resolved, that an engrossed copy of this resolution be presented to Mr. Bob Pantano as evidence of the sincere sentiments of this legislative body.

    And at this time, I would like to present this citation to you and congratulate you for your hard works and effort.

  • (Applause.)

  • The Chair -- oh, I'm sorry.

  • -- we allow you to speak, Mr. President, if it's okay, we have a small -- that's your job -- a small introduction, if that's okay, Council President, before you acknowledge.

  • I'm not aware. What are you attempting to do, sir?

  • (Music playing.)

  • The Chair recognizes Mr. Pantano for remarks.

  • I'm overwhelmed by this. Mr. President, members of Council, my friends at Council here, everybody in the Chambers, distinguished guests, thank you, thank you, thank you. This is a great day for me, and we've been doing this show for 36 years, since 1977. Of course a little time before that in my other lifetime in Camden.

    But I'm a kid from South Philly, grew up 7th and Federal, took the SEPTA buses, SEPTA trolleys and wireless trolleys to Neumann at 27th and Mifflin, hopped on the subway to Temple University, proud to be in the Hall of Fame there.

    So I was just a kid in South Philly that wanted to be in music. There were so many great, great guys to follow in their footsteps from South Philadelphia, so many great DJ's in Philadelphia. And all I am doing is carrying on the tradition that we started, keeping the sounds alive from the Cameo-Parkway days with Chubby Checker and Dee Dee Sharp, the Philly Sound with Gamble and Huff, and the disco sounds. So it's great music to work with, and we're so happy that people still enjoy all this great music. And I work at a great radio station, 98.1 WOGL. Would you please recognize them.

  • (Applause.)

  • We have our General Manager and Vice President, Jim Loftus; our Program Director, Anne Gress. We have our General Sales Manager, Dave Scopinich, Mark Terruso. The WOGL family is here. They give me the opportunity to play what I like, do my thing, and it's just great being able to keep the sounds going week after week. And the other things that's important to me is the charity work. I want to thank Mr. Jim Binns, James Binns, who started the Hero Plaque Program. Jimmy.

  • (Applause.)

  • He brought me on board with the Hero Thrill Show, with the police and firemen plaque ceremonies, and it's an honor to do that, because they need us. The families need us of our fallen heroes, the children. It's all about setting them in school. As Councilman Kenyatta Johnson said, we do the fundraisers in South Philly at Neumann Goretti, at Vendemmia to do something good for the citizens of Philadelphia, get the kids a quality education like I did and give them an opportunity. Everybody deserves an opportunity, and that's what it's all about.

    WOGL opens their doors once a year two days, they turn the radio station over to Children's Hospital, and we raise millions of dollars each year, and it's a wonderful thing. I think we're the only radio station that does something like this. So they should be commended, and I'm proud to work on such a great radio station.

    This gentleman here, Pat Delsi, started my career, gave me a shot in 1972 on WCAM in Camden on the 18th floor of City Hall. Thank you, Pat. It's been a great ride.

  • (Applause.)

  • I got my fellow DJ's here; Pete Serratore, my new PR person, thank you so much; Joe Callari, Nick Teti, Tony Q, Nicky G. I don't want to miss anybody. Of course my long-time producer, Tony Harris. It's been a great ride, Ton.

  • If I had to spend 36 years with somebody, I'm glad it was you. I mean, really like -- it's a marriage between he and I. Every Saturday night we still have a lot of fun, and I think that's the secret of it. So ladies and gentlemen, thank you for listening, because without you, we wouldn't be standing here.

    Thank you very much.

  • We actually brought this show back at the Ripley Music Hall at 6th and South. We were working for Stephen Starr, who is an entrepreneur now in the restaurant business in Philadelphia, and one of our account executives went to him and said, Why don't we do a radio show. Well, are you crazy? A DJ going to fill my place? Well, the first night we did the show back in 1982, there were lines around the block and 1,000 people showed up to the Ripley Music Hall. We worked for the Blatsteins in Northeast Philly. So we've been up in your district, Bobby. I think I've worked everywhere in Philadelphia, from the Airport to the Great Northeast to West Oak Lane to Juniata, North Philly, West Philly.

    I also want to -- I have my family, my in-laws here, my mother and father-in-law, Sal Massara and Jean Massara. Sal was a captain in the Fire Department. Thank you for your service. Captain Massara.

  • (Applause.)

  • And we have Cecil Parker here recording all this, who sings our closing song, "I think I'll Tell Her," keeps the sound of Philly alive. And I brought in the great lead singer of the Drifters, who sings "Up On the Roof" and "Under the Boardwalk," Mr. Rick Sheppard and his lovely wife.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you, Pete and Jane, Councilman Kenyatta Johnson. One beautiful guy. Nice to see you at our events. He came out. In fact, all the Councilmen come out to see our great events.

    Support the charities. Let's do good things for the citizens of Philadelphia, and that's what it's all about, and I'm proud to be a Philadelphian.

    Thank you so much.

  • (Applause.)

  • We love Philadelphia.

    One other thing. You're going to like this one. I want to thank John Dougherty. I am a card-carrying member of Local 98, Electricians Union, communications.

    Go unions.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you.

    Council will be at ease.

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Thank you. At this time, the Chair recognizes Councilwoman Brown, who will present a resolution recognizing the Project on the Status of Girls and Young Women in Philadelphia. Would Maxine and Clarice Bailey please join the Councilwoman at the podium and those accompanying those individuals, please come also. Thank you.

    And joining the Councilwoman, we have Councilwoman Sanchez and Councilwoman Bass and Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Thank you, Mr. President.

  • We have a number of organizations this morning that come together to look at and examine what is the status of women and girls in Philadelphia, and let me assure you, Mr. President, that only two of this enormous coalition will be speaking on behalf of the group. But I would be remiss not to acknowledge Girls Justice League; Women's Way; Girls Inc.; Advancing Girls; the Pennsylvania Council of Children, Youth and Family Services; Pathway Services; Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Temple University Youth Service Incorporated; the Identity Project; and ArtWell. Together, this coalition of women organizations have come together to recognize the Project on the Status of Girls and Young Women in Philadelphia.

  • Whereas, a broad based coalition of organizations is commissioning a comprehensive look at the state of girls and young women ages twenty-four and under in the City of Philadelphia; and

    Whereas, the project will include quantitative and qualitative research with support from the Institute for Women's Policy Research for the purposes of providing centralized, reliable baseline data on the socioeconomic status, educational opportunity, crime and personal safety and health and well-being of Philadelphia's girls and young women; and

  • Whereas, the quantitative component will also establish the basis for a coordinated, data driven program and funding priorities that supports girls and young women, that creates a platform for advocacy and community dialogues on issues affecting girls and young women, and serve as a catalyst for creating policy agenda to better support the needs and interests of young girls and young women;

    Whereas, the qualitative research will ensure that the voices of young girls and women are firmly embedded in the project by allowing girls and young women to serve as researchers, documentarians, advocates and co-facilitators of the community conversations through electronic surveys, focus groups and multi-medium reflection of the lives of girls and young women in response to all the data collected; and

  • Whereas, the findings from the research will be used as the centerpiece for public hearings within each Council district to consider the implications of the project for creating stronger programs, policies, practices and funding policies that lead to girls and young women's successful transition to adulthood; and

    Whereas, public policy making, resource allocation and coordinated service delivery, and educational systems would be well served to have up-to-date data that reflects the current status as well as the hopes and dreams of girls and young women; and

  • Whereas, this City Council resolution responds to the needs of girls and young women throughout the City of Philadelphia by supporting public hearings and an assessment of the data currently collected by its public agencies and service providers; now, therefore, be it

    Resolved, by the Council of the City of Philadelphia, that we hereby recognize this important initiative on the status of girls and young women in Philadelphia.

    Further resolved, that an engrossed copy of this resolution be presented to the Coalition on the Status of Girls and Young Women in Philadelphia as evidence of the sincere sentiments of this legislative body. Introduced by Blondell Reynolds Brown and supported by all the members of the Philadelphia City Council.

    Time is overdue when we need to stand up and speak up for girls.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you.

    The Chair recognizes Maxine and Clarice Bailey for remarks.

  • (Two individuals speaking at once.)

  • I'm just following the script.

  • Good morning. My name is Shakira Hansley, and on behalf of all the girls and young women in Philadelphia under the age of 24, I would like to thank you, Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, as well as your staff for your ongoing support of all girls and young women.

    We would also like to express our gratitude for the City Council recognizing the need and support of all girls and young women in Philadelphia by authorizing public hearings when we can make our face and voice heard.

    Thank you to the Girls Justice League and the Coalition on the Status of Girls and Young Women in Philadelphia, for you have and we know you will continue to tirelessly work to help us and support us as we are researchers, documentators, advocates, and co-facilitators to ensure that the data collected truly expresses our current situation and what we need to be great.

    I was born and raised in Philadelphia. After being abandoned at birth by my biological mother, I was placed in foster care. However, I was adopted at 15 months by a loving and caring single mother. She instilled in me values and morals that are still within me today, and even as a teenager, when everything she said to me went in one ear and straight out the other, she placed me in teen mentoring groups that were filled of other successful young women who helped me to know that it is a cool thing to be educated and a positive contributing member of society.

    Of course, I went on to high school, graduated, went to college, and I'm working on my first career. However, when I turn on the TV, when I talk to another girl in school or when I even read the statistics, the horrible reality hits me that being a successful 24-year-old woman in Philadelphia today makes me the minority. It is because of this that I stand here today, and my desire to advocate for girls will continue.

    All of these women standing behind me today will not stop our efforts until the success of the minority becomes the success of the majority.

    The passage of this resolution today is what was needed as a vehicle to alert the public, but to also help organizations representing girls empower us to live prosperous lives. These women and girls that you are empowering today will be the force in Philadelphia that will help us with forward mobility.

    On behalf of the Girls Justice League and the Coalition, I would like to thank you, but I also want to ensure you that your vote will not be in vain.

    Thank you.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you, Shakira.

    I got to tell you, I was worried that there was not going to be a step up and I was going to need a bench.

    My name is Erica Makowski and I'm a social worker with Youth Service Incorporated and a Board member for the Girls Justice League. First, I want to thank the City Council for passing the resolution in support of the status report project on girls and young women in the City and a special thank you to Councilwoman Brown for supporting this as well as Katherine Gilmore, her aide, and understanding and acknowledging the importance of this for our girls and young women in the City.

    I am so proud and tremendously honored to be a part of this coalition of amazing, amazing women from the City supporting this project. I have actually, opposite of Shakira, have only lived here in the City for two years, and I have seen it and met it through the eyes of a social worker. I have seen the beauty and the uniqueness of this amazing city as well as the need, and for me, the most beautiful, unique, and needed part of this city are the young girls and the young women of it.

    I have been blessed to hear the stories, the dreams, the hopes of these girls as well as their goals and expectations they have for themselves, but somehow it seems along the way some of those dreams gave way to a reality that they just weren't expecting nor hoping for and some, as we all know, worse than others. It also feels like somewhere the community support stopped listening and providing a space for those girls' voices, and to be honest, maybe there was no space in the first place.

    So this is the reason why these women and myself are standing before you all today. We want to support the girls and young women of this city claim their space. We want the community to support what they say and change what we need to in order for their voices to be heard and their goals to be reached. These are my goals. These are the goals of the Coalition.

    So I am excited and grateful to be here in this room at this time, because it feels like the City of Philadelphia is also saying we support our girls and young women claim their space.

    Thank you so much.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you.

    Council shall be at ease.

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Thank you so much. At this time, the Chair recognizes Councilwoman Brown, who will present a resolution on behalf of Councilwoman Tasco recognizing May as Hepatitis Awareness Month in Philadelphia. Would Dr. Stacy Trooksin, Ivory Allison, and those accompanying them please join the Councilwoman at the podium.

    And also joining Councilwoman Brown, we have Councilwoman Sanchez and Councilwoman Bass.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. On behalf of Council colleague Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco, who chairs our City Council's Committee on Health and Human Services, I'm pleased to join my colleagues and members of those who care about this issue in recognizing May as Hepatitis Awareness Month in Philadelphia.

    Whereas, Hepatitis is a medical condition defined by the inflammation of the liver and characterized by the presence of inflammatory cells in the tissue of the organ and the condition can be self-limiting or can progress to fibrosis and cirrhosis; and

    Whereas, the American Liver Foundation was created in 1976 with a mission to facilitate, advocate, and promote education, support, and research for the prevention, treatment, and cure of liver disease and conditions like Hepatitis, and liver disease is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, taking approximately 27,000 American lives each year; and

  • Whereas, a group of viruses known as the Hepatitis A, B, and C viruses cause most cases of Hepatitis worldwide, but Hepatitis can also be caused by toxic substances, certain infections, and autoimmune diseases; and

    Whereas, any Hepatitis virus presents a serious medical concern and the Philadelphia metropolitan area has a high prevalence for individuals living with the Hepatitis C infection and over 40,000 Philadelphians are living with Hepatitis C, which can cause liver cancer and death; and

  • Whereas, the Hepatitis C Allies of Philadelphia (HepCap) is positioning Philadelphia as a national leader in the fight against Hepatitis C by mobilizing local stakeholders to raise the public profile of this virus as an urgent health priority, identifying gaps in local Hepatitis C services, and to develop collaborative and innovative projects to improve access to Hepatitis prevention, testing, and treatment services; now, therefore it be

    Resolved, by the Council of the City of Philadelphia, that we recognize May as Hepatitis Awareness Month.

  • Further resolved, that an engrossed copy of this resolution be presented to representatives of the American Liver Foundation and the Hepatitis C Allies of Philadelphia as an expression of the appreciation of this legislative body.

    This resolution was introduced by Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco and supported by all the members of City Council.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • (Applause.)

  • The Chair recognizes Dr. Trooksin and Ms. Allison for remarks.

  • Hello. Good morning. My name is Ivory Allison, the Executive Director of the American Liver Foundation, Mid-Atlantic Division based here in Philadelphia, and I just would like to thank Councilwoman Tasco, who is not here, Councilwoman Brown and every other Councilperson here today for this resolution.

    Liver disease and Hepatitis is rising. It's increasing, and Dr. Trooksin will give you a little information about that, but I just want everyone to know liver disease and Hepatitis, you hear about it and you always think negatively. Maybe you think about alcohol or drug uses. And we want to let people know that that's not true. You can get Hepatitis from going to the nail salon, going to the hairdresser, the barber shop. You can also get it from getting a tattoo, getting your ears pierced. It's rampant and it's huge and it's increasing in Philadelphia, and we want people to know that.

    We have plenty of programs, events so that people can know how can you get it. We have free educational programming. We can go into schools, come to your company and inform you of what's going on.

    Thirty million Americans have liver disease and about four to five million have Hepatitis C. And Dr. Stacy Trooksin, who is a member of our Medical Advisory Committee and the Co-Chair of HepCap, will tell you a little bit more about Hepatitis C.

    Thank you.

  • Good morning. Thank you to members of Council for passing this resolution. My name is Stacy Trooksin. I'm an infectious disease physician at Drexel University College of Medicine. I'm a public health researcher, and I'm the proud community co-chair of the grassroots organization called HepCap, Hepatitis C Allies of Philadelphia. But today I'm here as a concerned citizen about my city.

    Hepatitis C is the most common blood-born infection in the United States. It is five times more common than HIV, yet has a fraction of the funding. Hepatitis C is often called the silent killer, where infected individuals are asymptomatic for as long as two decades before showing signs of liver disease associated with cirrhosis or liver cancer. Fifty to 75 percent of individuals infected are unaware that they're infected.

    The vast majority of these individuals are baby boomers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recognize the urgency of increasing the number of baby boomers aware of their Hepatitis C status by recommending that all individuals born between 1945 and 1965 be tested once in their lifetime. The reason to test is simple: Hepatitis C can be cured. Knowing your status allows individuals to get into care so they can learn how to keep their liver healthy and obtain the medication they need to be cured of infection.

    Philadelphia is uniquely positioned to become a leader in the fight against Hepatitis C. We have five major academic centers with liver transplant programs. We have physicians, community-based organizations, and talented staff at the Department of Public Health that are passionate about this cause and are ready to serve. We have HepCap to harness all of this energy into action but, most importantly, we have 40,000 individuals already diagnosed with Hepatitis C in Philadelphia and many, many more unaware of their diagnoses.

    Our citizens deserve to know their Hepatitis C status. We can do better, and the CDC says we should do better. If we don't, Philadelphia's baby boomers will eventually learn of their HCV diagnoses, but unfortunately, it will be because they have developed symptoms, like accumulation of fluid in the abdomen, confusion, jaundice, and varices, which can result in internal bleeding.

    Not only will this result in preventable deaths, but it will result in millions and millions of healthcare dollars needlessly spent on managing end-stage liver disease, liver cancer, and for a few of the lucky ones liver transplant.

    We have a cure for Hepatitis C, and now there are over 90 drugs in development that will make the treatments that we have shorter in duration, easier to tolerate, and more efficacious.

    I invite you all to become a champion in this effort. Support this mission and join HepCap. Members of Council, you will find information in your folders about how your districts are affected by Hepatitis C. You will also find some red and yellow ribbons that you can wear in support of this cause. You'll find information about HepCap, including our website and our next meeting at the Department of Health at 500 South Broad Street on June 5th at 5:30, and we invite everybody in the room to come. We hope to see you there.

    Thank you.

  • (Applause.)

  • (Council at ease.)

  • Thank you. The next order of business is communications. Would the Sergeant-of-Arms please deliver the messages from the Mayor to the Chief Clerk.

    Mr. Decker, please read those messages.

  • To the President and members of the Council of the City of Philadelphia, pursuant to Sections 4-604 and 2-307 of the Home Rule Charter, I am today transmitting to the Council the recommendations of the City Planning Commission on the following bills: Bill Nos. 130326, 130327, and 130328; and

    I am pleased to advise you that on May 21, 2013, I signed all of the bills that were passed by Council at its session on May 9, 2013; and

    I am transmitting herewith for the introduction and consideration of your honorable body an ordinance amending Title 19 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Finance, Taxes and Collections," by providing for a City cigarette tax and by authorizing the School District to provide for a School District cigarette tax; and

    Also an ordinance amending Chapter 19-1800 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "School Tax Authorization," by amending Section 19-1805, entitled "Authorization of Liquor Sales Tax," by revising the tax rate; and

    An ordinance amending Chapter 19-3200, entitled "Keystone Opportunity Zone, Economic Development District, and Strategic Development Area," by authorizing the creation of three new keystone opportunity expansion zones; and

    An ordinance authorizing the Director of Housing, on behalf of the City, to file applications with the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development for a Community Development Block Grant; and

    An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to enter into a lease agreement with the St. Agnes MOB for use by the City of a portion of the premises located at 1930 South Broad Street; and

    An ordinance authorizing the Procurement Commissioner to enter into purchase obligations for the delivery of electric and natural gas energy supplies for use by facilities owned and leased by the City; and

    An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to convey certain or all interests in portions of a parcel of land located at and in the vicinity of the Northeast corner of the intersection of Roosevelt Boulevard and Poquessing Avenue (commonly referred to as 8205 East Roosevelt Boulevard); and

    An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to acquire certain land in the 30th Ward of the City of Philadelphia, located along the Schuylkill River between South Street and Christian Street, known as 770 through 80 Rear Schuylkill Avenue; and

    An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property, on behalf of the City, to enter into a sublease agreement with the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development for use or further sublet by the City of premises located at 1211 through 13 Bainbridge Street and 1220 through 22 Kater Street; and

    An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to convey, to the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development, a 90 foot wide strip of land located between Roosevelt Boulevard and 2700 Southampton Road; and

    An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Parks and Recreation and the Water Commissioner to enter into a lease with the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development, under which the City would lease the East Park Reservoir West Basin and adjacent park land, and pursuant to which PAID would enter into a sublease for the Premises with the East Park Leadership and Conservation Center, all under certain terms and conditions.

  • Thank you, Mr. Decker. Do you have any additional communications?

  • I have none, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, sir.

    The next order of business is the introduction of bills and resolutions.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Kenney.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer one bill.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 19-3801 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Finance, Taxes and Collections," and such other provisions as may be appropriate, to reduce the net profits tax burden on certain existing and new businesses, for the purpose of generating growth in existing businesses, the birth of new businesses, and the creation of jobs.

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. Today I introduce one bill and one resolution.

  • An ordinance amending Title 14 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Zoning and Planning," by adding special provisions for the area bounded by 38th Street, Ludlow Street, Chestnut Street and 37th Street.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And a non-privileged resolution approving the redevelopment contract of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for the redevelopment and urban renewal of a portion of the West Philadelphia Redevelopment Area, identified by house number and street address as 4226 through 32 Powelton Avenue.

  • That resolution will be on next week's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Greenlee.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. On your behalf, I offer one bill and one resolution.

  • An ordinance authorizing Atul Amin, owner and operator of the newsstand located on the southeast corner of 17th and JFK Boulevard, to construct, use and maintain conduits in, under and across the southeast corner of 17th and JFK Boulevard for the purpose of supplying electrical service and telephone service to the newsstand.

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And a non-privileged resolution authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to execute and deliver to the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, without consideration, deeds conveying conditional fee simple title to certain City-owned lots or pieces of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon, situate in the Eighteenth and Thirty-Second Wards of the City of Philadelphia.

  • That resolution will be on next week's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Henon.

  • Thank you, Council President. Today I introduce three bills, one of which is being co-introduced by yourself, Council President, and Councilman Oh.

  • An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to convey certain or all interests in portions of a parcel of land located at and in the vicinity of the Northeast corner of the intersection of Roosevelt Boulevard and Poquessing Avenue (commonly referred to as 8205 East Roosevelt Boulevard).

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And an ordinance amending Section 19-1806 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Authorization of Realty Use and Occupancy Tax," including by providing for special tax provisions for manufacturers, and making conforming changes.

  • That bill will also be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance amending Chapter 2-300 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Property Assessment," by further providing for the manner in which assessments are determined.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I have four bills, one is on your behalf, and two resolutions, one is privileged.

  • An ordinance authorizing the Director of Commerce to enter into a Second Extension of the Use and Lease Agreements between the City of Philadelphia and each of the airlines servicing Philadelphia International Airport.

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

  • And an ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to enter into a lease agreement with St. Agnes MOB for use by the City of a portion of the premises located at 1930 South Broad Street.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance authorizing the Procurement Commissioner to enter into purchase obligations for the delivery of electric and natural gas energy supplies for use by facilities owned and leased by the City.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to acquire certain land in the 30th Ward of the City of Philadelphia, located along the Schuylkill River between South Street and Christian Street, known as 770 through 80 Rear Schuylkill Avenue.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And a non-privileged resolution authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to execute and deliver to the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, without consideration, deeds conveying conditional fee simple title to certain City-owned lots or pieces of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon, situate in the Thirty-Sixth Ward of the City of Philadelphia.

  • That resolution will be on next week's Final Passage Calendar.

  • And a privileged resolution honoring, recognizing and commending Mr. Bob Pantano for his contribution on the radio, television and area concerts and his music, creativity, charity and community service.

  • That resolution will be on today's Final Passage Calendar.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Sanchez.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. No bills or resolutions.

  • Thank you, Councilwoman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Green.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer one bill on your behalf.

  • An ordinance authorizing the Director of Housing, on behalf of the City, to file applications with the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development for a Community Development Block Grant.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman O'Brien.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I have no bills or resolutions today.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Goode.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer no bills or resolutions today.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Brown.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer one bill.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 17-104 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Prerequisites to the Execution of City Contracts," by requiring contractors seeking to do business with the City to disclose certain demographic information including gender, race and geographic data of those serving as board members and executive staff.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Jones.

  • Mr. President, five bills on your behalf.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 19-3200 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Keystone Opportunity Zone, Economic Development District, and Strategic Development Area," by providing for additional zones or subzones.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance amending Chapter 19-1500 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Wage and Net Profits Tax," by revising certain tax rates.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance amending Chapter 19-1800 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "School Tax Authorization," by amending Section 19-1805, entitled "Authorization of Liquor Sales Tax," by revising the tax rate.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance amending Title 19 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Finance, Taxes and Collections," by providing for a City cigarette tax and by authorizing the School District to provide for a School District cigarette tax.

  • That bill will also be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Parks and Recreation and the Water Commissioner to enter into a lease with the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development, under which the City would lease the East Park Reservoir West Basin and adjacent park land to PAID.

  • That bill will also be referred to committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman O'Neill.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer one bill.

  • An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to convey, to the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development, a 90 foot wide strip of land located between Roosevelt Boulevard and 2700 Southampton Road.

  • That bill will be referred to the appropriate committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Squilla.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer three bills today.

  • An ordinance authorizing Mekong River Restaurant to construct, own and maintain an open-air sidewalk cafe at 1120 South Front Street.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance amending Section 9-213 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Farmers' Markets," by amending the permissible locations.

  • That bill will also be referred to committee.

  • And an ordinance authorizing Fond Bistro doing business as Fond Restaurant to construct, own and maintain an open-air sidewalk cafe at 1537 South 11th Street.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Bass.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I offer one bill.

  • An ordinance establishing a parking regulation on Greene Street, west side, Windrim Avenue to Roberts Avenue.

  • That bill will be referred to committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Oh.

  • Thank you very much, Mr. President. I offer two privileged resolutions.

  • A privileged resolution commemorating and celebrating the first All-Army Reunion being held on June 15th, 2013, under the leadership of the Philadelphia Veterans Comfort House.

  • That resolution will be on today's Final Passage Calendar.

  • And a privileged resolution commemorating and honoring Ryan Chalmers on his "Push Across America" challenge: crossing the United States from Los Angeles to New York City, arriving at Philadelphia on Wednesday, June 12, 2013 in his racing wheelchair.

  • That resolution will also be on today's Final Passage Calendar.

    That concludes our introductions of bills and resolutions. The next order of business is reports from committee.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Jones for a report from the Committee of the Whole.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. The Committee of the Whole reports two bills with a favorable recommendation.

  • Thank you, sir.

    Mr. Decker, please read the report.

  • To the President and members of the Council of the City of Philadelphia, the Committee of the Whole, to which was referred Bill No. 130141, entitled "An ordinance amending Chapter 19-2900 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Senior Citizen Special Tax Provisions,' by providing for those circumstances where a participant in the tax freeze program authorized by that Chapter would owe less taxes as a result of a reduction in the tax rate or the assessed value of the taxpayer's property but for his or her prior enrollment in the program"; and

    Bill No. 130308, entitled "An ordinance amending Section 19-1303 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Discounts and Additions to Tax,' by tolling additions, interest and penalties when the assessed value of property is under appeal; limiting what the Department can bill for tax years under appeal; and requiring for the tax year under appeal payment of an amount at least equal to the prior year's tax; all under certain terms and conditions," respectfully reports it has considered and amended the same and returns the attached bills to Council with a favorable recommendation.

  • Thank you.

    The Chair again recognizes Councilman Jones.

  • Thank you again, Mr. President. I move that the rules of Council be suspended so to permit first reading this day of Bills No. 130141 and 130308.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded that the rules of Council be suspended so as to allow reading this day of Bills No. 130141 and 130308.

    All those in favor will say aye.

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. These bills will be placed on our First Reading Calendar for today.

    The Chair now recognizes Councilman Green for a report from the Committee on Finance.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I report two bills from the Finance Committee with a favorable recommendation.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    Mr. Decker, please read that report.

  • The Committee on Finance, to which was referred Bill No. 130161, entitled "An ordinance amending Chapter 19-1800 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'School Tax Authorization,' to provide for the rate and computation of realty use and occupancy tax; and adding a new Chapter 19-3900 to The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Realty Use and Occupancy Tax,' to provide for a City realty use and occupancy tax"; and

    Bill No. 130325, entitled "An ordinance approving the Fiscal Year 2014 Capital Budget providing for expenditures for the capital purposes of the Philadelphia Gas Works, subject to certain constraints and conditions, and acknowledging receipt of the Forecast of Capital Budgets for Fiscal Years 2015 through 2019," respectfully reports it has considered the same and returns the attached bills to Council with a favorable recommendation.

  • Thank you.

    The Chair again recognizes Councilman Green.

  • I move that the rules of Council be suspended so as to permit reading of the bills just mentioned.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded that the rules of Council be suspended so as to permit first reading this day of Bills No. 130161 and 130325.

    All those in favor say aye.

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it, and those bills will be placed on our First Reading Calendar for today.

    The Chair now recognizes Councilman Squilla for a report from the Committee on Streets and Services.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. The Committee on Streets and Services report 20 bills with a favorable recommendation.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    Mr. Decker, please read that report.

  • The Committee on Streets and Services, to which was referred Bill No. 120591, entitled "An ordinance establishing a parking regulation on 15th Street, east side, Conlyn Street to Grange Street"; and

    Bill No. 120592, entitled "An ordinance establishing a parking regulation on Copley Street, both sides, Manheim Street to Clapier Street"; and

    Bill No. 120593, entitled "An ordinance establishing a parking regulation on Carlisle Street, west side, Lindley Avenue to Duncannon Street"; and

    Bill No. 120658, entitled "An ordinance authorizing 2nd Street Brew House to construct, own and maintain an open-air sidewalk cafe at 1700 South 2nd Street"; and

    Bill No. 120785, entitled "An ordinance establishing a one-way regulation on West Seymour Street, from Morris Street to Wayne Avenue, eastbound"; and

    Bill No. 121003, entitled "An ordinance establishing a parking regulation on Elkins Avenue, north side, Olney Avenue to Wister Street"; and

    Bill No. 130124, entitled "An ordinance amending Chapter 12-3000 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Use Of An Automated Red Light Enforcement System To Prevent Red Light Violations,' by authorizing the installation of a red light enforcement system at the intersection of Stenton Avenue and Ogontz Avenue"; and

    Bill No. 130300, entitled "An ordinance authorizing Beacon on East Girard doing business as Kraftwork to construct, own and maintain an open-air sidewalk cafe at 541 East Girard Avenue"; and

    Bill No. 130301, entitled "An ordinance regulating the direction of movement of traffic on Warnock Street between Montgomery Avenue and Berks Street"; and

    Bill No. 130302, entitled "An ordinance establishing a no parking regulation on North Warnock Street, between West Montgomery Avenue and West Berks Street, west side"; and

    Bill No. 130303, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the revision of lines and grades on a portion of City Plan No. 55 by striking from the City Plan and vacating the legally open portions of Adams Avenue from Aramingo Avenue to its terminus southeastwardly therefrom"; and

    Bill No. 130304, entitled "An ordinance establishing a no truck parking regulation on Godfrey Avenue, from Tabor Road to Whitaker Avenue, both sides"; and

    Bill No. 130331, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation to construct, own and maintain various right-of-way encroachments within the public right-of-way on Vine Street, 10th Street and Pearl Street"; and

    Bill No. 130353, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the revision of lines and grades on a portion of City Plan No. 319 by striking from the City Plan and vacating the legally open portion of Pennway Street from Rhawn Street to a point approximately five-hundred fifty feet southwestwardly therefrom"; and

    Bill No. 130354, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the revision of lines and grades on a portion of City Plan No. 307 by striking from the City Plan and vacating Water Street from Race Street to its terminus southwardly therefrom"; and

    Bill No. 130355, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the plotting upon a portion of City Plan No. 58 of a two feet wide area for public pedestrian use extending along the southerly side of Pearl Street, from Tenth Street to a point approximately one-hundred thirty-eight feet westwardly therefrom"; and

    Bill No. 130358, entitled "An ordinance establishing a one-way regulation on East Price Street from Sprague Street to Boyer Street, westbound"; and

    Bill No. 130379, entitled "An ordinance amending Section 9-213 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Farmers' Markets,' by amending the permissible location of the west side of the 500 block of 43rd Street and adding as a permissible location the sidewalk and curb lane of the north side of Chester Avenue from 43rd Street for 500 feet west"; and

    Bill No. 130380, entitled "An ordinance amending Section 9-213 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Farmers' Markets,' by adding the north side of Fairmount Avenue between 19th Street and Uber Street, as a permissible location"; and

    Bill No. 130381, entitled "An ordinance amending Section 9-212 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Newsstands,' including by revising the requirements relating to license issuance; location of newsstands; design of newsstands; abandonment; and removal," respectfully reports it has considered the same and returns the attached bills to Council with a favorable recommendation.

  • Thank you.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Squilla for a motion.

  • Thank you. Good job, Mike.

    I move that the rules of Council be suspended as to permit the first reading this day of the 20 bills that were just into the record.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded the first reading this day of the 20 bills just reported from committee.

    All those in favor say aye.

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it, and those bills will be placed on our First Reading Calendar for today.

    At this time, we have consideration of the Calendar. The next order of business is the consideration of the Calendar. I note that the bills just reported from committee have been deemed to have had a first reading and will be placed on the Second Reading and Final Passage Calendar for the next session of Council.

    Mr. Decker, would you please read any other bills that are on the First Reading.

  • Bill No. 130255, entitled "An ordinance amending Title 14 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Zoning and Planning,' by amending sections of the /CTR, Center City Overlay District to apply special controls to an area bounded by the west side of I-95, Race Street, 4th Street, and New Street, all under certain terms and conditions."

  • The Chair agrees. This bill will be placed on the Second Reading and Final Passage Calendar for our next session of Council.

    The Chair now recognizes Councilman Jones for a motion concerning the bills on the Second Reading and Final Passage Calendar.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move that the rules of Council be suspended to permit the use of a Consent Agenda to consider the following bills on Second Reading and

    Final Passage Calendars: Nos. 120821,

    130250, 130184, 130305, 130326, 130327,

    130328, and 130057.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It

    has been moved and properly seconded that

    the rules of Council be suspended so as

    to consider the bills just read by

    Councilman Jones.

    All those in favor indicate by

    saying aye.

  • (No response.)

  • The

    ayes have it. The motion carries. And

    we will now consider the Consent Agenda.

    The Chair again recognizes --

    shortly. The Chair again recognizes

    Councilman Jones.

  • Thank you

    again, Mr. President. In addition to the

    bills being considered on the Consent Agenda, the following resolutions and bills are being called up for Second Reading and Final Passage Calendars today: Nos. 130395, 130422, 130423, 130426, 130428, 130433, 120054, 130185, 130244, 130246, 130247, 121037, and 130227. All other bills and resolutions are being held.

  • You're welcome, Mr. President.

  • Before considering these resolutions and bills, we will now consider public comment. The public comment will go as follows:

    You will be given three minutes to speak on a bill or resolution that is on the Final Passage Calendar. If you are interested in speaking, we ask that you please sign up to the table to my left.

    You will speak at the podium in the middle of the Council Chambers. There's a device on that podium. That device has a light. When the light turns green, it is your time to speak. When it turns yellow, you have 30 seconds to conclude your remarks, and when it turns red, your three minutes are up. So we ask that you please adhere to the guidelines. Thank you very much for your cooperation.

    Mr. Decker, please call the name of the first individual.

  • Brendan Lynch, commenting on 130244.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Good morning, President Clarke and members of Council. Thank you for the opportunity to address you today. My name is Brendan Lynch. I'm an attorney with Community Legal Services of Philadelphia. As you know, we represent low-income Philadelphians in a variety of civil legal matters.

    I'm technically addressing Bill 130244, an ordinance which authorizes transfers in appropriations from the General Fund. The main point I want to make today is that Council has the opportunity when considering appropriations to appropriate a small amount that we believe will pay big dividends. There's a huge problem in the City of Philadelphia of people with criminal record being denied employment. As you may know, the Attorney General's Reentry Council has estimated that as many as one in three Americans have a criminal record. The number in Philly may be even higher.

    Over 90 percent of employers now do criminal background checks. Just this past week, I've been assisting one of your constituents, a Philadelphia resident, who is desperately trying to find work, who has applied to multiple people and has been told by multiple employers in the healthcare field in the Philly region, You are qualified to work here, but we can't hire you until you clean your record. And this is a woman who has never been convicted of any charges, and she is being denied employment. She's not paying wage tax. She's not paying other taxes. We'd like to help her do that.

    I'm sure you all remember the incident last week where 3,000 people showed up at a job fair because they're desperate to find work, and the reason they're so anxious for City help is that they're being turned away due to their criminal records.

    Fortunately, many criminal records can be expunged. Arrest records can be expunged. Summary offenses can often be expunged, and the General Assembly in Harrisburg is considering legislation that might expand the number of offenses that can be taken off of somebody's record to include certain misdemeanors, and this can be a life-changing thing for the people involved.

    We are, therefore, urging City Council to fund our office to do expungement cases. We do them regularly. We do them successfully, and we don't charge the approximately thousand dollars, which is the going rate for the private bar, but we can only do that if we have the staff to do it. And without getting into our financial picture, times are really tough and we need to be able to fund the work that we do.

    We are asking Council to fund us to the tune of approximately a hundred thousand dollars. We believe based on data provided by the Economy League, solid numbers, people who have looked at the actual economic benefits of expungement, that a small investment could generate up to $6 million in tax revenue and savings. That's both wage taxes, that's reduced spending on people who have no alternative but to return to a life of crime. And we think that a $60 return for each dollar invested would be an excellent investment of taxpayer dollars, and we ask City Council to consider that strongly.

    Thank you very much.

  • Thank you for your testimony.

  • (Applause.)

  • Gina Apuzzo, commenting on 130225.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Good morning. I have a copy of my statement if Council would like a copy.

    My name is Gina Apuzzo. I'm a resident of Philadelphia and I work as a dance educator in the City. I volunteer in a financial accountability group called PhARE, Philadelphians Allied for a Responsible Economy. In November of 2011, myself and 13 others staged a citizens foreclosure at the Wells Fargo on 17th and Market. We foreclosed on Wells Fargo because of their racist predatory lending, tax dodging, illegal foreclosure practices, and duping the City into swap deals that hemorrhaged millions of dollars from our already suffering School District. But the people of Philadelphia believed we had a right to be there that day to demand that Wells Fargo stop hurting our City. In February of this year, we were found not guilty of the charges resulting from our citizens foreclosure by a jury of our peers.

  • (Applause.)

  • And to me that means the people of Philadelphia have found Wells Fargo guilty of their abominable banking practices.

  • (Applause.)

  • I ask Council to vote no on Bill 130225. Because of the swaps that involved Wells Fargo, we are currently bleeding 12 percent of our school's budget in interest payments alone, which amounts to $280 million. That's $280 million going into the pockets of Wells Fargo CEOs while we are in a $304 million school deficit and closing 23 public schools this year. We need to put Wells Fargo into a month-to-month contract while we push for alternatives. We must demand Wells --

  • (Applause.)

  • We must demand Wells Fargo waive service fees on the school debt or refund swaps cancellation fees. Wells Fargo needs to help mitigate our school's crisis instead of profiting from it.

    You must delay renewing the City's payroll services contract with Wells Fargo.

    Thank you.

  • (Applause.)

  • Kelly Andrews, commenting on 130057.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Mr. President, members of the Council, my name is Kelly Andrews. I live in Fishtown, 610 Gaul Street, and I am a health initiatives representative for the American Cancer Society here in the City.

    Today I'm speaking on behalf of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, also known as ACS CAN. ACS CAN is the advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society. With me is Diane Phillips, Senior Director for Policy at ACS CAN.

    We appreciate the actions taken by City Councilman William Greenlee and the Committee on Public Health and Human Services in proposing Bill 130057. At this time, we are asking you to consider tabling the bill for further consideration.

    Regulating indoor tanning beds is an important health and safety issue. However, we cannot support the bill as currently drafted because it does not fully protect minors under the age of 18 by preventing indoor tanning bed use. Parental consent is not an effective or reliable barrier to indoor tanning. Parents who do not understand the serious risk posed by indoor tanning beds and who allow their teens to use them will unknowingly put their children in harm's way.

    The science is clear. Tanning bed use is a risk factor for skin cancer, including deadly melanoma, a type of skin cancer than can be fatal.

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified indoor tanning beds as Group 1, the highest level of cancer risk. Minors under age 18 are especially at risk for the damage associated with overexposure to ultraviolet radiation, such as that found in tanning beds, because their skin cells are dividing and changing more rapidly than those of adults.

    In fact, six different national and international organizations, including the World Health Organization and the National Toxicology Program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, have all issued reports on the adverse health effects associated with the use of indoor tanning facilities and have recommended that minors under the age of 18 not use them.

    We are all aware of the "tan mom" incident took place in New Jersey last year, but I have another story. Last month, our staff met with Pennsylvania parents who have in the past year lost their beautiful 28-year-old daughter to melanoma. Jen had started using tanning beds in high school. With deep regret, her father acknowledged, We did not think using a tanning bed was a good idea, but we did not think that it could kill her. You can help Philadelphia parents and protect our young people by passing a stronger bill.

    May is the month for high school proms. Young people are getting ready for the big event by getting the right clothes and, unfortunately for many, getting a tan. They and their parents remain unaware that the incidence of melanoma is increasing rapidly and adult -- in children and adults. Melanoma is now the second most common form of cancer for individuals age 15 to 29.

    In Philadelphia, minors cannot purchase tobacco products or alcohol. We are asking for consistent health policy. The only way to fully protect teens is to prevent minors from using tanning beds altogether. We hope you will considering strengthening this important bill, and please vote to table Bill 130057 for further consideration.

    Thank you for the opportunity to speak today, and we would be happy to answer any questions.

  • (Applause.)

  • Tiffany Green, commenting on 130395.

  • That's the first bill.

    Good morning, everyone. We came here to ask Council to table this bill. This is about a housing project, affordable housing project, that Councilman Johnson promised for his community. However, there has been no notification. We had -- we met with the Chief of Staff. He said that they were going to do housing for already established housing and rehab. What has happened is -- then we didn't hear any more about it. Then we were personally called to come down here and support Councilman Johnson and his office regarding the affordable housing project, because when the developers were attacking the office and saying about his project was going to stop them from building in the community. So we did. So then after that, then we didn't hear anything more. Then all the sudden, we heard on WURD that a $2.2 million bill was being read and passed, and we heard Councilman Clarke addressing anybody down here to testify, and no one came down to testify. Why? Because nobody knew about it. There was no e-mails that went out. Nothing went out regarding the project. And now the project is being moved forward.

    We're hearing that now -- and then what happened was -- I'm getting ahead of myself. Then what happened was when we came down and testified, we were testifying to rehabs. Now we find out there's a bunch of lots going on, and the lots are going to turn into these large three-story houses in our area that the community does not want.

    We're saying by you passing this bill, you give by-right privileges to the City to come down and build what they want.

    These are the houses that were built by our first NSP money. These were supposed to have been affordable housing for people in the community. They turn out to be three-story houses, decks, garages, and 30 of these houses were built in the Point Breeze area. And then on top of that, these houses do not look like affordable housing for people in our community who can afford. They do not look like it.

  • (Applause.)

  • And we're saying -- we're asking you to table this. We want you to take a look at these houses, because these houses are not -- I don't think President Obama meant this when he put out money for NSP to build houses like this for our community.

  • (Applause.)

  • And then on top of that, you sit up here. You don't want to give District 33 any kind of raises or anything, but yet you want to build houses that are going 300 and -- $300,000.

    We're asking you to table this bill and have community meetings --

  • (Applause.)

  • -- have community meetings regarding this bill and go through proper procedure for us. Otherwise, you get by-right policy to the City, and we'll be back with those -- and those particular houses went for $178,000, and they're still sitting empty one year later. They're still sitting empty right there at 20th and Dickinson. So do we want those houses? No, we don't. If you look at underneath, we want the other houses that they built up in Cecil B. Moore, $63,000. They get a ten-year tax abatement --

  • (Microphone cut off.)

  • Thank you for your testimony.

  • Theresa McCormick, commenting on 130395.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

    MS. McCORMICK: My name is Theresa McCormick and I'm from the Point Breeze area.

    We have serious concerns. We don't -- we are not just giving you talk. Here are our ten concerns:

    One, Councilman Johnson, you supported Ori Feibush with 13 luxury apartments at Point Breeze and Titan Street. Two hundred residents came out and told you no, but you gave him a support letter anyway. Okay?

    Concern No. 2, Councilman Johnson, you signed off on 30 City-owned lots which was used with the NSP money. Again, who was using that again? Ori Feibush. This was March of 2012.

    Concern No. 3, you refused to discuss the three-story concerns that the community have, but you gave Korman Suites their project in Eastwick.

    Concern No. 4, Councilman Johnson, you gave a support letter again to Ori Feibush for a whole block at 20th and Federal, which is being built at this time. But in the media, you made a stink that the two of you were fighting and had us to come down to support you against Ori, but in fact you deceived the community because you gave him that support letter.

  • (Audience members yelling.)

    MS. McCORMICK: Concern No. 5, his office gave a support letter to a known market-rate developer named John Longacre. His staff promised to hold a zoning meeting regarding the recent zoning project, but it never took place, but you gave a support letter to the ZBA. Longtime community residents called Concerns Citizens of Point Breeze tell us that the information about the zoning was never given to us. John Longacre is a person who has came into our community to change the name from Point Breeze to Newbold, but, again, in the Business Journal of 2007, John Longacre states that he is an urban gentrifier.

    Concern No. 6, Councilman Johnson, you put in a $2 million bond for this housing project, no notification. Your office says that there's three levels of this housing. You have not met with the community of what the project is all about. We found out about it on WURD. And the Council has also questioned why the community is not down here to testify. Because we were not notified.

    Concern No. 7, no community meeting or notification for zoning reclassification for St. Agnes Hospital from a CMX-3, which allows housing, but people don't know that that has to do with condos.

    Concern No. 8, no community meeting or notification for Point Breeze for the new housing project --

  • (Microphone cut off.)

  • (Ms. McCormick still speaking.)

  • (Ms. McCormick still speaking.)

  • Ma'am, ma'am, ma'am, one second. First, your time is up, but, second, you're not talking about a bill that's on the Calendar.

    MS. McCORMICK: Our concerns has to do with the housing bill, and because we're concerned about the housing bill is because of the things that has happened.

  • All right.

    MS McCORMICK: Why should we -- if you let me finish, which I only have two --

  • Ma'am, your time is up. Ma'am, your time is up.

    MS. McCORMICK: Councilman.

  • Ma'am.

    MS. McCORMICK: Two minutes.

  • Ma'am, your time is up.

    MS. McCORMICK: Give me two minutes.

  • (Ms. McCormick still talking.)

  • We get your point, ma'am. We get your point.

  • (Ms. McCormick still talking.)

  • Ma'am, ma'am, ma'am, your time is up. I didn't ask you anything. Time is up.

  • (Applause.)

  • (Ms. McCormick still talking.)

  • I didn't ask you a question, ma'am. Your time is up, please. We let you come down. You've been at a number of hearings. Thank you.

  • (Applause.)

  • Before we proceed, I want to recognize Councilman Johnson.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I just wanted to note just for the record, because I don't mind agreeing to disagree with folks, but about 95 percent of the information put forth publicly -- and I don't have a problem following up with the two individuals -- totally inaccurate. Public record can be researched on any of those positions. I've engaged in several different groups in my neighborhood regarding any projects that we're doing. However, in cases where we agree to disagree, folks decide to take a position, rather it be publicly, from their own perspective, because you're not doing it according to their agenda, how they want things to be done. And that's the neighborhood that I lived in all my life. Anyone that knows me in the neighborhood know that I stand firmly on what I'm advocating for, the actual place my family and I still reside. But nevertheless, it will be addressed.

    Thank you very much, Mr. Council President, for your time.

  • (Audience members yelling.)

  • Excuse me. Excuse me. All right. Folks, you have an opportunity. If you want to testify, come down and sign up. You can testify at the mic, please. So please no hollering from the rafters. Thank you.

    Yes, sir.

  • Thank you very much, Mr. President and Councilmembers. My name is Joseph Levy. I am representing the American Sun Tanning Association. I am Executive Director of International Smart Tan Network, the educational institute for professional tanning facilities all across the United States.

    I'll be concise and appreciate the opportunity. We support legislation that constructively bolstered the standards that professional tanning salons already have in place, informed parental consent before a minor uses a tanning facility. So we'd like to congratulate Councilman Greenlee for pursuing this approach, educating parents and children that there are risks to overexposure while acknowledging that many in the healthcare field and many parents support the concept of getting a base tan in a moderate and responsible fashion.

    We have one minor objection, a very easy fix that we'd like to suggest to this bill. While the legislation promotes education for both parents and teenagers, it perhaps unintentionally treats parents like teenagers. It requires a parent to accompany a teenager on every single tanning salon session as opposed to signing an informed consent form on the initial session that acknowledges that there are dangers of overexposure and that the parent allows the child to use the tanning facility. We would support that approach fully.

    With me are Valerie Lavinia from Hollywood Tans, owns several facilities here in Philadelphia, and Carol Statts, who is a mother of three sons who all use tanning units, who would be inconvenienced by that standard, who doesn't have the time to accompany them on every single session, but has worked with her sons and her family to understand that there are risks to overexposure. She teaches them sunburn prevention.

    There are many other parents and Valerie has collected letters from many of the parents, from Anne Marie Parker, who has a teenager that she teaches to make these intelligent decisions; from Darlene Horne, who is a 16-year-old who has eczema, who tans after school a couple of times a week to treat her eczema as a low cost way to do this, lower cost than going through the healthcare system, but she cannot attend the sessions with her because she's at work; from Grace Lazia, who is a teenager who says this is an extreme inconvenience.

    So this change that we would suggest protects the spirit of Councilman Greenlee's bill without driving business outside of Philadelphia, which this bill would do if in fact you required parents to attend every single session, because they would be able to tan in salons outside of the City limits. And it respects the ability of your citizens to make informed choices for their families.

    So we would support that minor change. We encourage you -- and we spoke with Councilman Greenlee about that. We encourage you to understand the whole facts about this.

    Thank you.

  • Thank you for your testimony.

  • Thank you. Just very quickly, I think you heard both sides of this argument. I just want to -- as in much legislation, we try to find a middle ground. American Cancer Society, even though they never spoke to me, wanted teens banned totally. The gentleman that just spoke wants a parent just to sign once. We think this is a good middle ground, the parent accompanies the child to each session so he or she can see the effects each time.

    Melanoma is a very serious disease, often caused by these tanning beds. So I think we've reached a middle ground on this bill.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    Mr. Decker.

  • Clarc King, commenting on 120118.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Thank you, President of the Council. Thank you, members of the Council. I come once again to protest the sale of Philadelphia Gas Works to a private entity.

    I don't see the benefit to the population generally. PGW undergirds the City's economy, and the sale will probably threaten the survival actually of the citizenry.

    Philadelphia must disentangle itself from too-big-to-fail management, and I reference the Dodd-Frank Act. Public sector finance of government has become warfare conducted by other means, forcing the shutdown of schools, the sell-off of property and assets, and the purging of its workers.

    I ask once again that the City consider the public bank of Philadelphia. It must become a reality.

    I'd like to thank the City Council members, the President of the Council in advance to vote no on 13022 [sic] and move Wells Fargo to a month-to-month status while the City pursues the creation of the public bank of Philadelphia.

    Drexel University is hosting the public bank of Philadelphia organization tonight, and I ask that the members attend.

    Thank you very much.

  • Thank you for your testimony.

  • (Applause.)

  • Kenneth Walker. Kenneth Walker, commenting on 130428.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Good afternoon. Pastor Kenneth Walker, the First Born Church.

  • We honor you. We thank Council President and Councilman Jones for enabling us to finally get to the place where we can be relocated at 51st and Merion Street. The First Born Church was uprooted, moved, promised at the Parkside. We were there since 2000, and after 2008 we lost our church under eminent domain actually. And I just want to say that -- thank Councilman Jones for his response to us and helping us to be relocated.

    I just want to say that it would be really nice if we could all -- during these kind of processes under eminent domain, sometimes we have to move out of the district. And so there's no soon to be no collaboration with the other districts when you move or to get a property or something to be relocated. And so we need that help.

    I sponsor a prayer for a better Philadelphia every Saturday morning from 6:00 to 6:30 a.m. for one half an hour. We pray for a better Philadelphia. And I believe that it would be easier for the churches -- it's a difficult thing for church and state to be able to work together. I don't know why, but we're just saying people vote, and so we need that kind of understanding.

    We would have to move. We did not want to move from 52nd and Jefferson Street. We had a nice place. It was a wonderful location, but we gave it up for the mall, and it took so long for us to even get to this place in relocation. We going to yet need your support as we go through to finishing this process, because to build we still going to need some more support. And we appreciate all your support. It's been a long journey trying to get back to church as we knew it. So please.

    Thank you so very much. Help us in the future that we can do the work that God called us to do as a church and as a neighborhood and as a people.

    Thank you.

  • (Applause.)

  • Sylana Christopher, commenting on 130225.

  • (Witness approached podium.)

  • Good morning, President Clarke and City Council audience. My name is Sylana Christopher. I am a Fight for Philly member and a parent of three.

  • (Applause.)

  • I'm here today to ask City Council why are you guys so quick to award a City contract to Wells Fargo? Council has spent months working on AVI and weeks trying to find enough money for our schools, but it has spent almost no time in consideration giving lucrative City contract to a bank that has directly harmed our city.

    Wells Fargo is getting a free pass, just like many other big businesses and big banks in Philadelphia, but Wells Fargo --

  • (Applause.)

  • But Wells Fargo should be paying its fair share as well.

    Why are we granting a contract to a bank that engaged in risky swap deals with the City and schools, costing millions of dollars that could be funding teachers and supplies? I worry that City Council's commitment is to getting money from regular people as myself, but not enough to make sure that huge profitable banks pay their fair share.

    Wells Fargo --

  • (Applause.)

  • Wells Fargo has taken money from our schools and our children. We are their executive -- why are their executives not here today? They should be arguing their case if they want the City's business, and they should be repaying money that they've taken. Wells Fargo's contract should be continued on good behavior and fair dealings. There's no reason for the City to be frantically looking for money while it gives the banks big pass.

    So today I rely on City Council to do what is right and help the City of Philadelphia.

  • (Applause.)

  • Thank you.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Goode.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I'm actually growing tired of fake activism. I'm actually growing tired of people who don't realize what hard work has been done over several years. We're not even here today debating about Wells Fargo. The bill is not coming up for a vote. It is an Administration bill because the Administration selected Wells Fargo. When there's an Administration bill that comes before Council to be introduced, it comes through the Council President. The Council President's Office asked me to introduce the bill to make sure that the work that's been done into this process in terms of fair lending, community reinvestment went through the right process. And so essentially I have not just for the last year but the last several years, maybe a decade or more, established model legislation nationally to look at certain issues.

    So I don't disagree with the issue of whether Wells Fargo and other big banks have done some bad things. I was against big banks before it was popular to be against big banks. The truth of the matter is, I can still be against big banks. What I'm actually dealing with today is the fact that if we don't want to do business with Wells Fargo, then we can consider Councilman Kenney's bill to just take them off the list. I've actually taken banks off the list several times.

    When I first came to Council, there were 30 depositories. I whittled it down to eight depositories because of the things that people weren't doing. I consistently take people off the list every year. If we want to take them off the list, we can do it.

    Secondly, this issue came up last year, and I voted against Wells Fargo. And last year I oversaw the process that the City Treasurer's Office went through to make sure there was a fair process, to make sure that people actually looked at the lending disparity studies that were done, to make sure that community reinvestment goals were set, to make sure that fair lending plans were done to address lending disparities that existed within those studies, and to make sure that everything was done fair and square.

    I don't care who won or who lost, and there's no voting on it today. If someone is sincere about their activism, then what they're looking for is, one, just to remove Wells Fargo as a bank, period, and we'll vote on that, and/or if you care about swaps, then put that in the criteria for how we select our payroll depositories. But to just do something for the sake of activism to draw attention to an issue that's not even necessarily a real issue related to the City itself. When the issue of swaps came up originally, I brought the issue of swaps, because I was working with a Councilman out of Los Angeles, Councilman Alarcon. At that point, SEIU was working on the issues of swaps. Councilman Alarcon amended his legislation modeled after my legislation to take into consideration swaps.

    So then we examined the swap issue here. We found that it didn't really apply to the City. It applied more to the School District and the Delaware River Port Authority and some other entities.

    There have been no swap deals done under the Nutter Administration, period. This is an old issue. And I'll be more blunt since someone tried to boo when I said fake activism. I was actually told by some of the organizers around this issue that when it was pushed last year, it was pushed to help President Obama. That's why I didn't speak about it being a fake issue. But I am not going to jeopardize the work that I've done and had people play around this issue of responsible banking. It's a real issue that we will deal with in several different ways. If you want to add the criteria related to swaps, then let's do that. If you want to go after specific banks, let's do that. But let's protect a system and protect a process that's been set up over years where what we've seen is there are times when -- and, in fact, in testimony on this bill, we had someone testify that other banks should be used because they didn't do swaps. One of the banks they cited that should be used was TD Bank. TD Bank only gave 4.3 percent of its home mortgages to African Americans. Did the activists know that? No. So let's just call it what it is. People are using an issue to be against big banks in general, but if you want to hold big banks accountable, do the homework to find out how to do it. Let's amend our laws to say let's take swaps into consideration. And if you take swaps into consideration, then let's have a fair competition, and that's that.

    I don't really care at the end of the day whether it's Wells Fargo or which bank it is. We're not voting on this bill today. We probably won't vote on this bill at least until the end of the session. You can come here every week and say it shouldn't be Wells Fargo. At the end of the day, I might agree with you, but the question is the same as I asked at the hearing, who should it be?

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    Mr. Decker.

    No. We don't have a back and forth. You do that at a public hearing. We don't go back and forth. But thank you for your testimony, ma'am.

  • I'll be seeing him this weekend. Thank you.

  • There are no other speakers on the public comment list, Mr. President.

  • All right. There being no other individuals here to testify, we will now consider -- Ms. Green, no, it doesn't work like that. You already testified, ma'am.

  • I was supposed to testify on two bills.

  • (Microphone cut off.)

  • Ma'am, you already testified.

  • (Ms. Green still talking.)

  • Ma'am, you already testified. You have three minutes. You should have gotten all those comments in your three minutes.

  • (Ms. Green still talking.)

  • Well, I'm explaining it to you now. Ms. Green, if you want to testify in your three minutes, you have to testify on the bills at that time. You can't come back and forth.

  • Two separate bills.

  • Ms. Green, all due respect...

  • (Ms. Green still talking.)

  • We will consider that. We will consider that.

  • (Ms. Green still talking.)

  • We will consider your request. Thank you.

    MS. McCORMICK: Excuse me, Councilman.

  • (Ms. McCormick talking.)

  • (Ms. McCormick still talking.)

  • We're not going to let you --

  • (Ms. McCormick still talking.)

  • Ma'am, we're not going to let you -- I'm telling you, you've testified. You were given your three minutes, and you can come back to the next session of Council, ma'am.

  • (Ms. McCormick still talking.)

  • Ma'am, we can talk about this after the Council session. We have to proceed with our Consent Agenda.

  • (Ms. McCormick still talking.)

  • The bill was not on the Calendar, ma'am. It wasn't on the Calendar for today's final passage.

  • (Ms. McCormick and Ms. Green talking.)

  • We will discuss it later. We have to proceed, ma'am. Thank you.

    Thank you very much for your cooperation. We will now consider today's Consent Agenda. I will ask Mr. Decker to read the titles of all bills on the Consent Agenda. After each title is read, any member may object to the inclusion of the bill on the Consent Agenda. Upon such an objection and without debate, the bill will be immediately removed from the Consent Agenda and placed on our regular Final Passage Calendar.

    Mr. Decker will now read the titles of the bills on the Consent Agenda.

  • Bill No. 120821, entitled "An ordinance continuing the Roxborough District, a neighborhood improvement district, beyond its termination date in an area that generally includes both sides of Ridge Avenue from Main Street to 7220 Ridge Avenue and certain blocks of streets that intersect that portion of Ridge Avenue; continuing the designation of the Roxborough Development Corporation as the Neighborhood Improvement District Management Association for the District"; and

    Bill No. 130250, entitled "An ordinance amending Subcode 'F' of Title 4 of The Philadelphia Code, 'The Philadelphia Fire Code,' the base code of which is the 2009 edition of the International Fire Code published by the International Code Council, with certain amendments thereto, by further amending the 2009 International Fire Code and the previous Philadelphia amendments"; and

    Bill No. 130184, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the Fire Department, as the Sponsoring Agency of Pennsylvania Task Force One, of the National Urban Search and Rescue Response System, to enter into multi-year agreements with Participating Agencies for the purpose of developing resources for emergency preparedness"; and

    Bill No. 130305, entitled "An ordinance to amend the Philadelphia Zoning Maps by changing the zoning designations of certain areas of land located within an area bounded by Broad Street, Morris Street, 15th Street, and Castle Avenue"; and

    Bill No. 130326, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the Commerce Director and the Commissioner of Public Property to acquire on behalf of the City an approximately 8.606 acre property located on 1070 Tinicum Island Road"; and

    Bill No. 130327, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the Commerce Director and the Commissioner of Public Property to acquire on behalf of the City an approximately 5.61 acre property located on Tinicum Island Road"; and

    Bill No. 130328, entitled "An ordinance authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to acquire certain land along the Schuylkill River between 56th Street (as extended to the Schuylkill River) and 58th Street"; and

    Bill No. 130057, entitled "An ordinance amending Title 6 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Health Code,' by adding a new Chapter providing for the regulation of tanning facilities.

  • Thank you, Mr. Decker.

    These bills having been read on two different days, the question for each bill now is shall the bill pass finally. The Clerk shall call the roll, and upon being called, each Councilmember shall vote aye on each of the bills, nay on each of the bills or indicate those bills for which the member is voting aye and those bills for which the member is voting nay.

    Mr. Decker.

  • Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Councilman Greenlee.

  • Councilman Johnson.

  • Councilman O'Brien.

  • Councilman O'Neill.

  • Councilwoman Quinones-Sanchez.

  • Councilwoman Reynolds Brown.

  • Councilman Squilla.

  • Council President Clarke.

  • Aye on all bills.

    A majority of all members having voted in the affirmative for each of the bills, the bills on the Consent Agenda are passed.

    We will now consider the bills and resolutions on the regular Second Reading and Final Passage Calendar.

    Mr. Decker, would you please read the title of 130395.

  • A resolution authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to execute and deliver to the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, without consideration, deeds conveying conditional fee simple title to certain City-owned lots or pieces of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon, situate in the Thirty-Sixth Ward of the City of Philadelphia.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. 130395 is adopted.

    Mr. Decker, please read the title of 130422.

  • A resolution authorizing the Commissioner of Public Property to execute and deliver to the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority, without consideration, deeds conveying conditional fee simple title to certain City-owned lots or pieces of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon, situate in the Sixth Ward of the City of Philadelphia.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. Resolution 130422 is adopted.

    Mr. Decker, 130423.

  • A resolution approving the redevelopment contract of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for the redevelopment and urban renewal of a portion of the North Philadelphia Redevelopment Area, identified by house number and street address as 1314 North Twenty-Eighth Street.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Greenlee.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. 130423 is adopted.

    Mr. Decker, 130426.

  • A resolution approving the redevelopment contract of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for the redevelopment and urban renewal of a portion of the Grays Ferry Urban Renewal Area, identified by house number and street address as 2545 Wharton Street.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. 130426 is adopted.

    Mr. Decker, 130428.

  • A resolution approving the redevelopment contract of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority for the redevelopment and urban renewal of a portion of the West Parkside Urban Renewal Area, identified by house number and street address as 5100 through 5122 Merion Avenue.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Jones.

  • Mr. President, I move for the adoption.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. 130428 is adopted.

    Mr. Decker, 130433.

  • A resolution urging the Pennsylvania Senate to adopt a Discharge Resolution on Senate Bill 12, which would require Pennsylvania to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Bass.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. 130433 is adopted.

    Mr. Decker, 120054.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 19-1300 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled "Real Estate Taxes," by providing for installment payment agreements and requiring commencement of enforcement action.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Green.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move the amendment, which has been circulated to everybody, and also want to note that Councilmember Sanchez would like to say a word on this bill.

  • Thank you.

    Councilwoman, would you like to speak now or prior to the approval of the amendment?

  • Yes, please. Thank you, Council President Clarke. I want to publicly recognize Sophie Bryan, who is not with us today, from Councilman Green's office, Jennifer Kates, and from your office, John Christmas for their work on this, who along with what I call the social justice legal community, CLS, and others and the Administration, I believe through this amendment -- and hopefully we'd like to publicly request support for this bill next week by our Council colleagues -- begins to provide the City with real tools for the discussion and the debate we've been having around AVI and property tax collections.

    We believe that this bill and through this amendment, we will have one of the best tax collection strategies and tools this city has ever seen. It protects low-income property owners in a very meaningful way by allowing them to have a very predictable process by which they can enter into a payment plan and an agreement so that we can collect those dollars. That carrot is important, but what's most important in this bill is the stick, the stick that allows the City to go after in a very aggressive way investors who believe they can sit on delinquent properties until they're ready to develop.

    So I want to thank all of the folks involved in what we believe to be a very, very important piece of legislation to move the discussion about collections and delinquent tax collections in the City.

    The Administration has worked very hard on this with us, and we believe it is beginning to act on its commitment to collect delinquent taxes. So I ask that all my colleagues not only support this amendment but if they have any questions between now and final passage, that they reach out to Councilman Green's office or mine.

    Thank you.

  • Thank you.

    There was a motion on the amendment for 120054. I wasn't sure if there was a second.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor for the amendment?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. Bill No. 120054 has been amended and will be placed on the next reading passage of City Council at our next session of Council.

    Mr. Decker, I believe we have 130185.

  • An ordinance authorizing and directing use of the Fiscal Year 2013 General Fund positive fund balance to increase an appropriation for the Fire Department for the undisputed $66,000,000 of the Fire Fighters' contract.

  • This bill has been read on two separate days. The question is shall the bill pass finally.

    Mr. Decker, please call the roll.

  • Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Councilman Greenlee.

  • Councilman Johnson.

  • Councilman O'Brien.

  • Councilman O'Neill.

  • Councilwoman Quinones-Sanchez.

  • Councilwoman Reynolds Brown.

  • Councilman Squilla.

  • Council President Clarke.

  • Aye.

    The ayes are 16; the nays are zero. A majority of all members present voting in the affirmative, the bill passes.

    Mr. Decker, 130244.

  • An ordinance authorizing transfers in appropriations for Fiscal Year 2013 from the General Fund, certain or all City offices, departments, boards and commissions; the Community Development Fund, the Mayor - Office of Housing and Community Development and the Grants Revenue Fund, the Director of Finance - Provision for Other Grants to the General Fund, certain or all City offices, departments, boards and commissions.

  • This bill has been read on two separate days. The question is shall the bill pass finally.

    Mr. Decker, call the roll.

  • Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Councilman Greenlee.

  • Councilman Johnson.

  • Councilman O'Brien.

  • Councilman O'Neill.

  • Councilwoman Quinones-Sanchez.

  • Councilwoman Reynolds Brown.

  • Councilman Squilla.

  • Council President Clarke.

  • Aye.

    The ayes are 16; the nays are zero. A majority of members present voting in the affirmative, the bill passes.

    Mr. Decker, 130246.

  • An ordinance authorizing transfers in appropriations for Fiscal Year 2013 from the Grants Revenue Fund, the Director of Finance - Provision for Other Grants to the General Fund, the Managing Director.

  • This bill having been read on two separate days, the question is shall the bill pass finally.

    Mr. Decker, call the roll.

  • Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Councilman Greenlee.

  • Councilman Johnson.

  • Councilman O'Brien.

  • Councilman O'Neill.

  • Councilwoman Quinones-Sanchez.

  • Councilwoman Reynolds Brown.

  • Councilman Squilla.

  • Council President Clarke.

  • Aye.

    The ayes are 16; the nays are zero. A majority of members present voting in the affirmative, the bill passes.

    Mr. Decker, 130247.

  • An ordinance authorizing transfers in appropriations for Fiscal Year 2013 within the General Fund, the Department of Human Services.

  • This bill has been read on two separate days. The question is shall the bill pass finally.

    Mr. Decker, call the roll.

  • Councilwoman Blackwell.

  • Councilman Greenlee.

  • Councilman Johnson.

  • Councilman O'Brien.

  • Councilman O'Neill.

  • Councilwoman Quinones-Sanchez.

  • Councilwoman Reynolds Brown.

  • Councilman Squilla.

  • Council President Clarke.

  • Aye.

    The ayes are 16; the nays are zero. A majority of members present voting in the affirmative, the bill passes.

    Mr. Decker, please call up 121037.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 19-2600 of The Philadelphia Code, entitled 'Business Income and Receipts Taxes,' by, including but not limited to, modifying certain definitions.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Green.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I move the amendment, which has been circulated to all members of Council, be adopted.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor for the amendment?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. Bill 121037 has been amended. It will be on our next session of Council on final passage.

    Mr. Decker, call up 130227 and the Chair recognizes -- call the bill, the title first.

  • An ordinance amending Chapter 19-200 of The Philadelphia Code by amending Section 19-201, entitled "City Depositories," by authorizing the City Treasurer to deposit funds in Bank of New York Mellon.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Kenney.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. First of all, I'd like to say that in the length of time that I've sat here, I must say that I've greatly admired Councilman Goode's efforts in basically throttling Wells Fargo for so many years to make them into an institution that takes into consideration how they lend, where they lend, who they lend to. There's been a number of efforts that he put forward, resolutions and bills, and I think I can easily say that I've supported a hundred percent of Councilman Goode's legislation since he's been here and I've had a chance to vote. So I have sat in admiration of his doggedness in dealing with institutions that do not show compassion, understanding, and fairness to people in our community.

    I'm going to ask you if you would, and I've asked you in advance, to hold this bill, because I think part of this whole overall discussion is what our relationship is with our banking institutions. At one point in time when Wachovia was close to going insolvent, we had 90 percent of our deposits in that bank. God knows what would have happened if they had gone under with that amount of money of City taxpayers' dollars in that bank.

    There's about $200 million -- not to pick on Wells Fargo, but there's about $220 million in deposits at that bank as we speak, and there are other banking institutions that obviously hold large sums of our money.

    I watch television at times and I see advertisements for commercial banks that talk about customer service, and customer service is their prime approach in trying to get people to put their money in their bank, and we are a big customer for a lot of banks, Wells Fargo included, and we may be some of those bank's biggest customers. There seems to be no leverage unless Councilman Goode has done the things in the past to leverage change in behavior. And I've turned to Councilman Goode this morning and talked about New York Mellon, and he is my community banking expert, that they did not get a very good rating in New York. Why we're sending Philadelphia dollars to a New York-based bank without a really full explanation. Now, I'm not on the Finance Committee. I did not participate in the hearing, but I don't think there was a large discussion or a wide-ranging discussion on why the Administration or the Treasurer needs to have this bank as a depository.

    There was a time in our city when banks were headquartered here in Philadelphia. Their national headquarters were here. There was a lot of gravitas and a lot more involvement with local banks that were headquartered nationally here. We've lost that because of the economy and ways things have changed over the years. So a lot of these banks are headquartered in other parts of the country, and even though they're a local presence, they are involved in community activities and they have changed their ways with community lending. I think we don't utilize the opportunity to leverage behavior better than we do.

    There's a lot of things that went on during the course of that fiscal crisis we just faced in this country. A lot of people lost a lot of money. A lot of taxpayers' money was used to make banks whole again. People's 401k's weren't made whole again. People's mortgages weren't made whole again. People lost their houses. And no one went to jail. No one was investigated or indicted. All these large banks all got -- all their CEOs got all their bonuses like it never -- they never skipped a beat. And we can't turn the clock back, but I say in going forward, we need better standards that we have to employ to spread our money around to the institutions that do the right thing. And as I think about that, I'm thinking about the School District. I mean, we are scrambling, literally scrambling, to find money for our schools. And we need to do that, and I understand that. Harrisburg has pretty much walked away. The feds have stopped giving. And we're still stuck with having to deal with what we have to deal with. They could play a role in this. They could play a role in providing at least some time, if not some money, to back off some of these debt service payments and swap deal exit payments and all the other things that we have to do.

    So, again, based on what Councilman Goode has said relative to his relationship with Wells Fargo and what he's been able to make them do, the right thing, I think going forward, the Mayor and this body needs to fairly vet what these banks are about, what their activities were during the course of the fiscal crisis and make good banking decisions as a big customer that we are.

    So thank you for agreeing to hold this bill today, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Goode.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I agree totally that we need to have a discussion about how we measure banks, and we need to take that seriously. I'm going to continue to be blunt, not just as I was earlier in this meeting but as I was at the Finance Committee hearing.

    The City of Philadelphia releases an annual lending disparity study every year that's about this thick. I read it cover to cover. New York also releases a disparity study that's not quite as thick.

    As I became a part of this national organization looking at municipal policy, I became a part of it because I was asked to be a keynote speaker at a responsible banking conference in New York. There's actually a report that came out about how to do local responsible banking ordinances. I will provide that to each member of Council as soon as I leave here electronically.

    In terms of whether we should take this seriously, we should and we have, and I thank Councilman Kenney for voting for actually every piece of responsible banking legislation that I've offered. To know how seriously we have taken it, this report will show you how we measure up to other cities. We are considered the leader.

    Since my legislation back in around 2001, 2002, several cities have embarked upon this, particularly after the convening conference we had. I've advised San Francisco. I've advised San Diego. I've advised Los Angeles.

    There's nothing wrong with the laws that we have on the books now, and so the banks that have come before us have gone through a rigorous process. If we want to add to that process, I'm fair game to that. This bill in particular I wouldn't say let's just hold it. Why? Because it's irrelevant. For anyone who actually understands a portion of the City Charter with regard to our authority and the City Treasurer's authority, our authority is simply to authorize and establish criteria. The City Treasurer's authority is to decide where the money goes. We can at any time decide to do whatever we want in terms of deciding who should be a City depository. We can authorize people. We can revoke their authorization. We can set standards for it, which I've done time and time and time again. But this is not an issue to just discuss. We should hold this bill today and then if Fight for Philly, Anne Gemmell, Jim Kenney or anyone else wants to actually examine this issue and take it seriously, then let's legislate on it and not just talk about it.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Green.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I too want to commend Councilman Goode and note that during the hearing in the Finance Committee, which I chair, on this bill that Councilman Goode specifically asked Bank of New York Mellon if they were going to comply with the laws that he has put in place, noted why they were not currently a depository, and received an affirmative response from them that they intend to do so.

    I have no objection holding this bill for two weeks. However, I want to be clear that the City Treasurer made clear to the Finance Committee, which as Councilman Kenney notes he is not on, that the leverage was applied to the Bank of New York Mellon in terms of providing the City a direct economic benefit worth millions of dollars in connection with commercial loans and other things we are going to get as a benefit or as part of making this bank a City depository, and that has been a strategy that our City Treasurer has followed with commercial banks and investment banks with which they are choosing to do business, saving us millions of dollars, leveraging our depository and other relationships with those banks.

    So it is in fact being done. We are leveraging these relationships and, as a consequence, saving millions of dollars of taxpayers' money every single year through the great work of our City Treasurer in this regard.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Jones.

  • Yes, Mr. President. Very briefly. One good thing about your presidency and administration is that you pick chairmen on their area of interest but also their area of expertise as well as their area of effort, and I don't think anyone has given more expertise, effort, and concern to the issue of banking other than Councilman Goode.

    And I think it's important to note that this bill was submitted by myself on your behalf, and at least two sets of eyes read it, and then after they read it, checked back with the expert in this body on responsible banking and gave us a thumb's up and comfort zone.

    So I echo Councilman Kenney's seal of approval, if you would, on this particular matter, and I'm ready to hold it, ready to move it. It's the will of the body, but I do know that this body takes banking and responsible banking and responsible lending and responsible inclusion in contracts very seriously, and I would defer to my colleague in his area of expertise.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Goode.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I'll be really brief. I want to thank Councilman Green for reminding me something I forgot that happened at the hearing. Essentially I did remind Bank of New York that they were removed from the list, and they said they knew that they fell out of compliance, but they didn't know they were removed from the list. And I said, Yeah, you were removed from the list because I took you off the list. And then I asked him, Do you want to play by the rules now?

    They said, Yes.

    I said, And if not, I'll take you off the list again.

    So in terms of how seriously we take that, those people who were at the Finance Committee hearing know it. Those people who have been here for several years know it. If we want to get more serious about it, then let's get more serious about it. And so if we want to hold this bill, fine, but this bill is actually not serious enough to hold. So we can move forward or hold it. It makes no difference to me.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    There are no other conversation on this particular bill, as a person who likes to keep their word, I was asked earlier to hold the bill, and I will hold the bill. So Bill No. 130227 will be held and it will be on the Final Passage Calendar at our next session of Council.

    Mr. Decker, do we have any additional resolutions?

  • A resolution honoring, recognizing and commending Mr. Bob Pantano for his contributions on the radio, television, area concerts and his music, creativity, charity and community service, introduced by Councilman Johnson.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • Thank you, Council President. I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No suppose.)

  • The ayes have it. That resolution is adopted.

  • And a resolution commemorating and celebrating the first All-Army Reunion being held on June 15th, 2013, under the leadership of the Philadelphia Veterans Comfort House, introduced by Councilman Oh.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Oh.

  • Thank you very much, Mr. President. This resolution was co-sponsored by Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell, Majority Leader Curtis Jones, Jr., and Councilwoman Cindy Bass, and I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. That resolution is adopted.

  • And a resolution commemorating and honoring Ryan Chalmers on his "Push Across America" challenge: crossing the United States from Los Angeles to New York City, arriving at Philadelphia on Wednesday, June 12, 2013 in his racing wheelchair, introduced by Councilman Oh.

  • The Chair recognizes Councilman Oh.

  • Thank you very much, Mr. President. This was co-sponsored by Councilman Curtis Jones, Jr. and Councilwoman Cindy Bass for a young man pushing a wheelchair for the first time from coast to coast, and I move for the adoption of the resolution.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It's been moved and properly seconded.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. That resolution is adopted.

  • There are no other resolutions on the Final Passage Calendar, Mr. President.

  • Thank you very much, Mr. Decker.

    Are there any speeches on the part of the minority?

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Oh.

  • Thank you very much, Mr. President. I just wanted to thank all the Councilmembers who have stepped forward to advocate on behalf of fairness in our city and really I think on behalf of the taxpayers of this city for the firefighters who have, time and time again it's been said, one and two arbitrations, one on appeal, and ultimately there's an undisputed amount of money of $66 million that we have authorized to be paid to them. And I know that each of the Councilmembers here in their own ways and on their own behalf have championed the causes of our firefighters and in particular, Council President, your efforts on behalf of all our City workers is really to be commended. Of course, we have our role, the Administration has its role, but I think that we have stepped up and done something that is in the best interest of our city.

    So I'd like to thank everyone and commend our body for doing something a little different, a little new, but I think very fair and right by the voters and by the taxpayers.

    Thank you.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Johnson.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I have one announcement. Next week at Yesha Fellowship Hall in South Philadelphia, May 28th at 2:00 p.m., State Representative Jordan Harris will be hosting a public hearing for House Bill 908 and House Bill 909, which propose amending legislation regarding the process of the expungement of certain crimes. And so he have introduced legislation to amend our state penal code, and he will be hosting a hearing along with State Senator Shirley Kitchen at Yesha Ministry Halls, and the hearing is regarding legislation that will focus on expunging certain crimes.

    Oftentimes individuals go and apply for a position. You don't have to just only have a felony, but various misdemeanors or any time you're actually arrested, it's documented. And so his bill will explore the possibility of expunging certain crimes of individuals' criminal records. So we want all individuals to come out who is interested in that area. That's May 28th at 2:00 p.m. at Yesha Fellowship Hall.

    Last, but not least, as always, yesterday myself, Councilman Mark Squilla, and Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell, we attended a press conference held by the Crosstown Coalition of Taxpayers. The Coalition released its report compiled by industry experts using the available assessment data that we recently requested from the Administration regarding AVI. The report found that the rate of error is far beyond industry standards, something many residents have expected since February.

    I want to commend Councilman Mark Squilla for arranging and requesting that OPA actually sit down with the Crosstown Coalition so they can compare data and actually really defend if their formula is accurate and the numbers according to their formula are accurate as we move forward with AVI. At least sitting down with the Crosstown Coalition and comparing both sets of numbers will give the public more confidence in this process. And, again, my public position has always been I think the numbers are still flawed just personally myself just based upon the inaccuracy that we received early on, but I do want to thank Councilman Mark Squilla for stepping up to the plate, reaching out to OPA, and requesting a meeting with the Crosstown Coalition and OPA regarding AVI and its formula.

    Thank you very much, Council President.

  • And also if everyone can have a great Memorial Day weekend with their families and just have an opportunity to enjoy themselves. Thank you.

  • Thank you, sir.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Henon.

  • Thank you, Council President. Today I introduced a bill that exempts manufacturers from the use and occupancy tax entirely. As I've said before, and I'll say it again, I'm committed to ensuring that Philadelphia becomes a major national and international center for manufacturing.

    I know that there are many different budgetary interests and needs out there, but I believe in Philadelphia's ability as a manufacturing hub can make Philadelphia stronger. I'm not certain what the outcome of these conversations will be, and I hope by introducing this exemption, we can have a thoughtful dialogue. As always, I welcome feedback from this body, any suggestions, and look forward to the conversations that lie ahead of us.

    In addition, I want to draw attention to the bill that we, you, Council President, Councilman Oh, and myself, introduced today that will give this Council the authority to hire an audit to audit OPA and will give us the access of the data and information about OPA's process, like the methodology, the work product and/or their lack of.

    So moving forward with transparency and objectivity, to post annual assessments publicly, I'm pretty excited about that. I'm excited about the prospect of finally having some answers from OPA, and I commend you for your leadership on this issue.

    That's all I have. Thank you.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman O'Brien.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. Last week, 317 violent crimes were reported to the Philadelphia Police Department. That number includes two homicides, 64 gun robberies, and 42 aggravated assaults with a gun.

    Since the start of 2013, 92 families lost a loved one due to violence in our city. This violence also deeply wounds our entire community. Unfortunately, the community's relationship with law enforcement has been historically stressed, strained, and fractured in many neighborhoods for a multitude of reasons. Honestly, I think more work needs to be done to repair those relationships in an honest and open fashion. Misconceptions and preconceived ideas need to be cleared out.

    The notion that some neighborhoods do not care is simply false. The good people in our neighborhoods far outnumber the troublemakers. That isn't a perception. The data tells us this is fact. The data tells us that a very small number of individuals are causing the majority of gun violence in our city.

    The focused deterrence strategy is built upon three pillars: social services, community voices, and law enforcement. Each performs its own integrated function for the success of the strategy.

    Today, I wanted to specifically talk about the community or moral voices component of that strategy. The focused deterrence strategy identifies, engages, and uses community figures willing to articulate key community standards to members of targeted groups at a call-in. Those standards are, the violence is wrong. There is no excuse for committing violence. You're doing enormous damage to yourself, your family, and your community. You're better than this. We care about you. We need you, and we want to help you.

    We're challenging the street code. It's not okay to go to prison. It's not okay to die. It's not okay to hurt someone, and your group will not have your back. The voices are community elders, family members, mothers of murdered children, mothers whose sons have gone to prison, old head ex-offenders, and faith leaders. These strong critical voices combined to articulate community standards and morals to undercut the street code. The community has simply decided enough. The community has decided the violence must stop.

    I hear their collective moral voice and I want to amplify it. I believe the effective and proven focused deterrence strategy can help them deliver their message and reduce gun violence in our city.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilman Green.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. I just want to briefly commend Councilmember Greenlee on the bill that passed today, 130057, with respect to the regulation of tanning facilities. Recently my family has experienced a number of people who had some serious operations due to melanoma. I myself have an appointment with a dermatologist this evening on this very topic. And I also want to note the presence of my former Director of Constituent Services, Marita Crawford, who is here today, who when she was on the State Board of Cosmetology as Governor Rendell's appointee tried to have just such a law passed at the state level, and once again Philadelphia is going to have to lead to get the state to pay attention to this very important issue.

  • Thank you, Councilman.

    The Chair recognizes Councilwoman Brown.

  • Thank you, Mr. President. You may recall as a result of the AVI hearings and, more importantly, the AVI public testimony that we were -- it was affirmed that the lack of awareness of the rollout of AVI was not where it should be, and vulnerable populations, particularly seniors and hard to reach populations that include those who don't speak English, revealed to us that we needed to do more as a body.

    I introduced a resolution calling for hearings on that topic asking members of the Administration to come back before us and tell us how we need to do it better before the imposed deadlines. In lieu of those hearings, Councilwoman Tasco and Councilmember Maria Quinones-Sanchez and I opted to have a briefing with the Administration that was led by Anna Wallace Adams, Chief of Staff for the Office of Finance.

    Subsequent to that briefing, members were provided a menu of options that we have to layer how we get to these hard-to-reach populations. So I want to offer a friendly reminder to my colleagues that the Office of Finance, specifically Anna Wallace Adams, need to hear back from everyone by May 31st so that she can hear from you how your particular allocation will be spent. We want to do better in reaching those populations, and now the Administration wants to help. So we need to do our part and tell them how we want to do that. As of yesterday, she's anxiously waiting to hear from all of us. So if we could please act on that and do all that we can to better reach seniors, hard-to-reach populations, and the vulnerable citizens across the City around the protections for AVI.

    Thank you, Mr. President.

  • Thank you, Councilwoman. And with that, I call on you again for a motion to adjourn.

  • Surely. I move that Council stand adjourned until Thursday, June 6th, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.

  • (Duly seconded.)

  • It has been moved and properly seconded that Council stand adjourned until Thursday, June 6th, 2013.

    All those in favor?

  • (No response.)

  • The ayes have it. Council shall stand adjourned.

    Thank you all very much.

  • (Stated Meeting concluded at 1:10 p.m.)